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More scepticism to immigrants and immigration
statistikk
2016-12-21T08:00:00.000Z
Population;Immigration and immigrants
en
innvhold, Attitudes towards immigrants and immigration, refugees, asylum seekers, labour immigrationPopulation, Immigrants , Immigration and immigrants, Population
true
Statistic Norway’s annual survey on attitudes towards immigrants and immigration is conducted on behalf of the Ministry of Justice and Public Security. The aim is to reflect the sentiment of the population with regard to various aspects of the country’s immigration and refugee policy and towards immigrants as a group.

Attitudes towards immigrants and immigration2016

Content

Published:

More scepticism to immigrants and immigration

One third of the population think it should be more difficult for refugees and asylum seekers to get a residence permit in Norway. This is an increase of 4 percentage points since last year. More people also think that immigrants represent a source of insecurity in society

Attitudes towards immigrants and receiving refugees. Per cent
200720152016
Most immigrants make an important contribution to Norwegian working life
Strongly agree313021
Agree on the whole414245
Disagree on the whole8714
Strongly disagree334
Most immigrants enrich the cultural life in Norway
Strongly agree323628
Agree on the whole353539
Disagree on the whole11812
Strongly disagree766
Most immigrants are a cause of insecurity in society
Strongly agree1179
Agree on the whole231923
Disagree on the whole273031
Strongly disagree192723
Attitudes towards refugees' and asylum seekers' access to residence permits in Norway. Compared to today, should it be easier, more difficult or remain the same as today?
Easier81512
As today505051
More difficult392933
Figure 1. Share thinking that refugees and asylum seekers’ access to permanent residence in Norway should be easier, more difficult or “the same as today”

Twelve per cent think it should be easier for refugees and asylum seekers to get a residence permit in Norway, while half the population think that access to permanent residence should be “the same as today”. One third think it should be more difficult to get a residence permit. These are some of the findings in the annual population survey of attitudes towards immigrants and immigration conducted by Statistics Norway between 4 July and 17 August 2016. This is the first survey after the surge of asylum seekers last autumn.

See the complete report Holdninger til innvandrere og innvandring 2016 here (in Norwegian only).

Fewer appreciate immigrants’ performance regarding work and culture

The share agreeing strongly or on the whole that “most immigrants make an important contribution to Norwegian working life” fell 7 percentage points since last year. Moreover, the belief that “most immigrants enrich the cultural life in Norway” decreased 5 percentage points since 2015. Two thirds still agree strongly or on the whole in each of these statements, while only 18 per cent disagree. 

The share agreeing strongly that all immigrants in Norway should have the same job opportunities as Norwegians declined 8 percentage points. That was also the case with the share agreeing fully that “labour immigration from non-Nordic countries makes a mainly positive contribution to the Norwegian economy’. The share agreeing on the whole in these statements however increased 7 and 5 percentage points respectively. 

There are now 86 per cent who think immigrants should have equal job opportunities and 63 per cent who believe that labour immigration from non-Nordic countries contributes positively to the Norwegian economy. 

More people consider immigrants as a source of insecurity

The survey moreover showed an increase of 6 percentage points in the share agreeing fully or on the whole that “most immigrants represent a source of insecurity in society”. Thirty-two per cent are of that opinion, while 54 per cent disagree. 

The share agreeing that “immigrants in Norway should endeavour to become as similar to Norwegians as possible” also increased 7 percentage points. Fifty-one per cent support this view, while 35 per cent disagree fully or on the whole. 

Fewer have contact with immigrants

The share claiming to have contact with immigrants fell 6 percentage points to 72 per cent in 2016. Fewer say they have contact with immigrants “at work” or “in close family relations”. Fewer also report daily contact. 

The attitudes towards immigrants vary according to background factors. Gender, educational level and contact are the most important background factors. Liberal attitudes are more common among women, those with a higher education and those with a wide range of contacts. Being male, poorly educated and lacking immigrant contacts shows the opposite trend. 

Political preferences are this time included in background factors. Established notions of the parties’ degree of immigrant-friendliness are reflected in the attitudes of their respective supporters.

Purpose of the surveyOpen and readClose

Statistic Norway’s annual survey on attitudes towards immigrants and immigration is conducted on behalf of the Ministry of Justice and Public Security. The aim is to reflect the sentiment of the population with regard to various aspects of the country’s immigration and refugee policy and towards immigrants as a group.