149941
forskning
2013-11-21T13:56:00.000Z
en

News about Research

Articles on research results are presented here.

  • Future manpower needs in the health care sector

    Public finances in the long term

    Published:

    The need for manpower in the health care sector is set to increase considerably going forward, particularly after 2020. Even without improvements in the standard of care, the need could double by 2060. With standard growth, the sector's share of total employment could be more than a third by 2060.

  • Do we need to work more? Consequences of less materialistic growth

    Macroeconomic analyses

    Published:

    How will working less and having more leisure time affect the Norwegian economy in the long term? A gradual shortening of the working day from 7.5 to 6 hours will, in isolation, reduce private consumption per capita by a third by 2060 compared with continuing to work the same number of hours as currently. Nevertheless, consumption in 2060 will be almost double the current level. Reduced working hours requires higher tax rates in order for the current public welfare system to be funded without violating the fiscal rule. In 2060, a tax rate on household incomes must be 10 percentage points higher than in the scenario without reduced working hours, and just over 12 percentage points higher than today.

  • Choice of spouse among Norwegian-born to immigrant parents

    Population trends, migration and mortality

    Published:

    About one out of five Norwegian-born women and men with immigrant parents born between 1972 and 1994 were married as per 1 January 2013. Three out of four of these were married to someone who also had an immigrant background. There is a clear correlation between country of origin and choice of partner.

  • Comparison of income growth and growth in pension payments

    Pensions

    Published:

    How does the income growth towards the end of a person’s working life compare with the growth in pension? It is important to analyse this in order to determine how the pension system should be regulated in the future.

  • Fertility rates and other demographics among immigrants and children of immigrants born in Norway

    Living conditions and social participation

    Published:

    The fertility rate among female immigrants in Norway has fallen in recent years, and was 2.1 children per woman in 2012. A key feature is that fertility declines in line with how long a woman has lived in Norway. Newly arrived female immigrants are also having fewer children than they did before.

  • Residency and access to children 2002, 2004 and 2012 - Changes in responsibilities and care of children for parents living separately

    Population trends, migration and mortality

    The share of parents with shared residency of children in 2012 has tripled since 2002. Fewer children live permanently with their mother, while the share of children living permanently with their father has remained stable at 7-8 per cent in the 10-year period.

  • Attitudes towards immigrants and immigration 2013

    Population trends, migration and mortality

    Published:

    The survey of attitudes towards immigrants and immigration, conducted by Statistics Norway in July and August 2013, shows that the share who completely or partly agrees with the statement "Most immigrants make an important contribution to Norwegian working life" has fallen by 8 percentage points since 2012.

  • Norwegian industries exposed to international competition

    Macroeconomic analyses

    Published:

    Which industries make up the internationally-exposed sector, and how has this part of the economy developed over time? The report shows that 14 per cent of employed persons in 2012 worked in exposed industries (E-industries). Since 2000, hourly wage costs have seen a higher increase in the exposed mainland industries than in the sheltered market-oriented industries (S-industries), while activity growth has been slightly lower.

  • Petroleum sector’s impact on the Norwegian economy and wages – future downsizing and sensitivity to oil price shocks

    Macroeconomic analyses

    Published:

    The use of oil revenues and petroleum sector demand will continue to be central to the Norwegian economy. This report presents projections up to 2040 and gives estimates of the macroeconomic effects of a large and sudden fall in oil prices.

  • Effects of increased petroleum sector demand and increased oil spending 2003–2012

    Macroeconomic analyses

    Published:

    The increased demand from the petroleum sector and the increase in the spending of “oil revenues” has had a major impact on the high economic growth over the past decade; it has increased employment and reduced unemployment. It has also diminished cost competitiveness and thereby reduced activity in traditional exposed industries.

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