247538
/en/energi-og-industri/statistikker/elektrisitet/maaned
247538
Larger electricity production
statistikk
2016-02-04T10:00:00.000Z
Energy and manufacturing
en
elektrisitet, Electricity, Power stations, electricity generation, electricity consumption, energy consumption, power production, hydro power, thermal power, wind power, power-intensive manufacturing, general supply, pumped-storage Power, grid rentEnergy , Energy and manufacturing, Energy and manufacturing
false
The electricity statistics map the production and consumption of electricity. Electricity production was 3.2 per cent less in December 2015 compared to December 2014.

ElectricityDecember 2015

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Larger electricity production

Electricity generation came to 145 TWh in 2015. This is 1.9 per cent higher compared with 2014 and the second highest figure ever recorded.

Generation and consumption of electricity. GWh
December 2015PercentagesChange in per cent from the same month in last year
Total production of power13 945100,0-3.2
Hydro power13 33695.6-3.6
Thermal power3162.33.0
Wind power2942.112.9
 
Net consumption of electricity11 760100,0-3.4
Consumption in extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas6605.62.2
Total consumption of electricity in power intensive manufacturing3 00625.62.6
Consumption without extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas and power intensive manufacturing8 09468.8-5.9

The high electricity production may be seen in conjunction with the large inflow of water. The building of power plants and upgrading of old power plants also contributed to a higher production level over time.

Hydro power the dominating type of production

Hydro power accounted for 95.9 per cent of the total electricity production in 2015, while thermal and wind power accounted for 2.4 and 1.7 per cent respectively. Compared to 2014, there were only marginal changes in the shares of production.

Large net export of power

Norway’s export of power totalled 22.0 TWh in 2015, while imports came to 7.4 TWh. This gave a net export of 14.6 TWh. In 2014, there was a net export of 15.6 TWh. Exchange of power between countries is determined by differences in generation and the consumption situation and prices, in addition to the capacity of the power lines. The large net export of power may be seen in conjunction with the warm weather and large inflow of water to the Norwegian reservoirs.

Rise in the total electricity consumption

The gross consumption of electricity came to 130.4 TWh in 2015; an increase of 2.9 per cent compared with 2014. The gross consumption of electricity encompasses consumption in the groups extraction of crude oil and natural gas, power-intensive manufacturing and electricity consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction. Net loss, pump storage use and other own consumption in the power stations are also included.

Increase in the electricity consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction

Electricity consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction amounted to 74.7 TWh in 2015; an increase of 2.8 per cent compared with 2014. Households, services and manufacturing other than power-intensive manufacturing account for the majority of the electricity consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction. Electricity consumption in households amounts to approximately 50 per cent of the electricity consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction.

Rise in the electricity consumption in power-intensive manufacturing

Electricity consumption in power-intensive manufacturing was 35.4 TWh in 2015. This is 0.9 per cent higher than 2014. Power-intensive manufacturing utilises electricity for the production of goods. Hence, the electricity consumption is not influenced by temperature.

Increase in the electricity consumption in extraction of crude oil and natural gas

Electricity consumption in plants for extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas on the mainland, including electricity distributed from the mainland to the Norwegian shelf, amounted to 7.0 TWh in 2015. This is 7.1 per cent more compared with the previous year. The electricity consumption in extraction on the mainland encompasses receiving and processing plants for crude oil and natural gas.