53273
/en/energi-og-industri/statistikker/elektrisitet/arkiv
53273
Increase in the electricity generation
statistikk
2011-07-13T10:00:00.000Z
Energy and manufacturing
en
elektrisitet, Electricity, Power stations, electricity generation, electricity consumption, energy consumption, power production, hydro power, thermal power, wind power, power-intensive manufacturing, general supply, pumped-storage Power, grid rentEnergy , Energy and manufacturing, Energy and manufacturing
false

ElectricityMay 2011

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Increase in the electricity generation

The production of electricity came to 8 535 GWh in May 2011; an increase of 12 per cent compared with the same month in 2010.

Production, consumption and export surplus of electric energy per month. GWh

Production, consumption and export surplus of electric energy in May. 1993-2011. GWh

So far this year, hydro power, thermal power and wind power amount to 93, 6 and 1 per cent of the total electricity generation respectively. While the share of hydro power has been reduced by 1.5 percentage points compared with January-May in 2010, the share of thermal and wind power has increased by 1.0 and 0.5 percentage points respectively. Among other things, the increase in the share of thermal power can be viewed in conjunction with considerably higher electricity generation in the combined heat and power plant in Mongstad this year.

More water in the reservoirs

According to NVE, the reservoir level was 25.9 per cent at the beginning of May. During the month, the filling increased by 12 percentage points to 37.9 per cent at the end of week 21. The median level and the minimum level for the same week in the period 1990-2007 are 44.7 and 27.1 per cent respectively.

Net imports of power also in May

Norway’s imports of electricity came to 828 GWh in May, while exports totalled 432 GWh. This gave net imports of 396 GWh. Norway has had net imports of power in all months in 2011 and so far this year the net import amounts to 8 062 GWh. This is the highest level we have recorded for the first five months in a year.

Decrease in consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction

Electricity consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction amounted to 4 892 GWh in May 2011. This is 7 per cent lower compared with the same month in 2010. The reduction in consumption can be viewed in conjunction with somewhat lower electricity prices and higher average temperatures. The average temperature in Norway was 0.8 degrees higher in May compared with the corresponding month in 2010. Households, services and manufacturing other than the power intensive account for the majority of the electricity consumption excluding power-intensive manufacturing and extraction.

Roughly no change in electricity consumption in power-intensive manufacturing

Electricity consumption in power-intensive manufacturing came to 2 859 GWh in May. This is 0.1 per cent higher compared with the same month in 2010.

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