6495
/en/befolkning/statistikker/innvgrunn/arkiv
6495
Growth in number of labour immigrants
statistikk
2007-10-26T10:00:00.000Z
Population;Immigration and immigrants
en
innvgrunn, Immigrants by reason for immigration, reason for immigration (for example work, refugee, family reunification), refugees, immigration background, non-Nordic citizens, country background, year of immigration, principal applicants, resettlement refugees, quota refugees, asylum cases, asylum seekers, family reunification, marriage establishmentImmigrants , Population, Population, Immigration and immigrants
false

Immigrants by reason for immigration1 January 2007

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Growth in number of labour immigrants

In 2006, 29 500 first-generation immigrants with non-Nordic citizenship immigrated to Norway for the first time. 80 percent of these immigrants came due to labour or family reunion. Over the last two years, the labour immigration has almost tripled.

Statistics about reason for immigration deal with all first-generation immigrants with non-Nordic citizenship that immigrated to Norway between 1990 and 2006. Persons who have come to Norway as family immigrants to refugees are included in family immigrants.

First year in Norway and reason for immigration. 1990-2006

In 2006 there were 29 500 immigrations from non-Nordic countries. 11 700 of these persons immigrated due to labour. Polish citizens made up the largest group of labour immigrants in 2006 at 65 per cent. 11 300 persons that immigrated to Norway in 2006 came as family immigrants. Since 2004 the labour immigration has almost tripled, from 4 000 to 11 600 persons.

7 out of 10 still here

In the period between 1990 and 2006 more than 284 000 persons with non-Nordic citizenship immigrated to Norway. About 122 000 (43 per cent) immigrated as family immigrants. Approximately one third have arrived as refugees (29 per cent), while 16 per cent immigrated due to labour. 11 per cent got permission for education. 70 per cent of those who immigrated in 1990 still live in Norway.

Most Iraqis

If we look at the period between 1990 and 2006, 18 300 Iraqis citizens immigrated to Norway. They made up the largest group of immigrants with non-Nordic citizenship, followed by immigrants from Serbia and Montenegro, Poland and Somalia with more than 15 000 persons each.

Settlement after reason for immigration. 1990-2006

People from Thailand- united with persons without immigrant background

Of 11 300 persons that immigrated to Norway as family immigrants, almost 7 000 came on family reunification while 4 500 immigrated for family to get married (for family establishment through a marriage). Of the people reunited with their spouse without immigrant background the majority, almost 600, came from Thailand.

8 out of 10 refugees stay in the country

The reason for immigration is significant to see whether immigrants leave the country or not. Among those who immigrated as refugees in the period between 1990 and 2005, 82 percent still lived in Norway in 2006. On the other hand, among those who immigrated for education only 38 percent lived here on the 1. January 2007.

Mostly Polish citizens

Polish citizens made up the largest group of non-Nordic immigrants in 2006 with 7 300, followed by Germans and Lithuanians. Polish citizens came mostly as labour immigrants.

The majority of the people that immigrated to Norway between 1990 and 2006 were women. There are however differences between the sexes when it comes to reason for immigration.

93 per cent of those who immigrated due to labour were men, while 56 per cent of people that immigrated as family immigrants were women.

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