6471
/en/befolkning/statistikker/innvbef/arkiv
6471
Immigrants from 200 countries in Norway
statistikk
2005-05-26T10:00:00.000Z
Population;Population;Immigration and immigrants
en
innvbef, Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, foreign born, country of birth, citizenship, period of residence, immigration background, country backgroundImmigrants , Population, Population count, Population, Immigration and immigrants
false

Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents1 January 2005

Content

Published:

This is an archived release.

Go to latest release

Immigrants from 200 countries in Norway

At the beginning of 2005, there were 301 000 first generation immigrants in Norway and 64 000 persons born in Norway to two foreign-born parents. The immigrant population counted for 8 per cent of the Norwegian population, and it is divided at approximately 200 different countries.

The immigrant population increased by 17 000 persons in 2004, or 4.9 per cent. The birth surplus was 3 800 and the immigration surplus 13 200. As comparison the whole population increased by 29 000 persons, or 0.6 per cent.

The ten largest immigrant groups in Norway. 1 January 2005. Absolute figures

The immigrant population in Norway by country background. 1 January 2005. Per cent

Three in four with non-western origin

265 000, or 72 per cent, of the persons in the immigrant population had non-western origin, and they counted for 5.7 per cent of the Norwegian population. About 61 000 of these came form Eastern Europe. 25 years ago 31 per cent of the immigrant population had non-western origin.

Among the western immigrant groups, the proportion of first generation immigrants is high. This is due to the fact that western immigrants to a larger extent get children with Norwegians than non-western immigrants, and these children are not part of the immigrant population. When two western immigrants get children together, they more frequently move back to their country of origin than non-western immigrants.

There were 63 900 persons born in Norway to two foreign-born parents. Persons born to two Asian parents was the largest group with 38 000 persons. As comparison there were only 13 800 persons born to two European parents. From single countries there were most persons born in Norway to two Pakistani parents with 11 800, followed by persons with Vietnamese parents (5 800) and Turkish parents (4 500). The corresponding figures for those with Danish and Swedish parents were 1 400 and 1 000 respectively.

One in three has lived shorter than 5 years in Norway

At the beginning of 2005, 32 per cent of the first-generation immigrants have lived shorter than five years in Norway, while 16 per cent have lived in Norway 25 years or longer. Almost half of the Danes have lived in Norway more than 25 years. On the other end, 84 per cent of the Afghans have lived in Norway less then five years. There were also a high proportion of Iraqis and Somalis whom have lived shorter than five years in Norway - 57 and 55 per cent respectively.

Many women from Thailand and the Philippines

There were almost as many women as men in the immigrant population, and this is the case for most of the immigrant groups. The proportion of women was high from Thailand (85 per cent), Philippines (76 per cent) and Russia (66 per cent), while there were slightly more men than women from Afghanistan (60 per cent), Great Britain (59 per cent) and Iraq (58 per cent).

The non-western immigrant population as part of the population. Per cent. 1 January 2005

30 municipalities above the country's average

There were immigrants resident in all the Norwegian municipalities, but two did not have any non-western immigrants. 30 municipalities had a higher proportion of immigrants than the country's average of 7.9 per cent. Most of these municipalities are located in the area around Oslo. Oslo had the highest proportion of immigrants with 22 per cent, followed by Drammen (17 per cent), Lørenskog (14 per cent), Askim, Skedsmo and Båtsjord (all 12 per cent).

Oslo had the highest part of non-western immigrants with 18 per cent, followed by Drammen (14 per cent), Lørenskog (11 per cent), Askim and Skedsmo (both 10 per cent). 47 per cent of the non-western immigrant population and 38 per cent of the western immigrant population lived in Oslo and Akershus at the beginning of 2005.

More figures in StatBank

Tables: