1239
/en/arbeid-og-lonn/statistikker/arbmiljo/arkiv
1239
Poor collaboration in public sector
statistikk
2001-11-27T10:00:00.000Z
Labour market and earnings;Social conditions, welfare and crime
en
arbmiljo, Working environment, survey on living conditions, working conditions, physical working environment (for example noise, work position, indoor climate), ergonomics, psychosocial work environment (for example well-being, conflicts, threats), bullying, organisational work environment (for example work load, working arrangements, employee participation), work-related health problems, accidents at workLiving conditions , Working environment, sickness absence, strikes and lockouts, Social conditions, welfare and crime, Labour market and earnings
false

Working environment, survey on living conditions2000

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Poor collaboration in public sector

In comparison with other industries collaboration in public sector is poor between employees and managers and among employees.

In May 2001 the first results from the Survey of Living Conditions 2000 were published. The focus then was on organisational and physical work environment, wages and prospects of further development, for men and women in different age groups. Statistics Norway now presents statistics from the areas of trade unionists and health and absence from work due to illness. In addition to gender and age, we also look at different industries, different sizes of establishments and different ways of working.

Public sector

In general about three of ten employees often or sometimes experience conflicts between employees and managers. In public sector, witch consists of public administration, education and health, 36 per cent of the employees experienced conflicts with managers.

24 to 26 per cent of the employees in public sector experience conflicts among employees. Among employees in general the percentage that experiences these kinds of conflicts is 18.

Employees in the smallest establishments

About three in ten employees in establishments with 1-19 employees replied that they to a high degree could decide their duties and assignments, while 25 per cent of all employees replied the same. Six in ten replied that they to a high degree could decide how to carry out their duties and assignments. 43 per cent can decide deadlines and work tempo. Also when it comes to deciding holidays employees in the smallest establishments have better control than other employees. But the tendency in all establishments is that the amount of control has decreased from 1996 to 2000.

While about three in ten employees in general often or sometimes experience conflicts between employees and managers, only two in ten employees in establishments with 1-19 employees experience the same. These establishments also have fewer conflicts between employees and between employees and customers / clients.

Safety deputies and work environment committees

The percentages of employees working in establishments with a safety deputy have decreased from 76 to 73 per cent from 1996 to 2000. The same trend applies to establishments with work environment committees. The percentages of employees working in these establishments have decreased from 55 to 51 per cent.

Membership in trade unions

57 per cent of all employees were members in a trade union in 2000. This was the same as in 1996. More women than men have joined a trade union. Six in ten female employees are members and 54 per cent of male employees are members.

Establishments with 200 employees or more have the highest level of membership in unions. 92 per cent of the employees in these establishments are members in a trade union as opposed to 45 per cent in establishments with 1-19 employees.

Most members in trade unions can be found in public administration, education and mining/power industries. While about eight in ten are members in a trade union in these, less than six in ten of all employees are members in a trade union.

Job-related health problems

Many employees have problems with muscular and skeletal problems as a result of their work conditions. Problems with the neck and shoulders are the most common ones. If we look at all muscular problems, a small decline has occurred from 1996 to 2000. 24 per cent had these problems in 1996, 20 per cent in 2000.

Women more often than men report muscular and skeleton problems as a result of their work situation. Especially women aged 45-66 years report these problems. About three in ten report these problems. Among men the same age the percentage is 15.

27 per cent of all employees reported that they felt down once a month or more often subject to critique or difficulties at work. Women experience this to a larger degree than men. Only 3 per cent of all employees reported that they to a high degree every day experience work as a psychical strain.

More serious problems such as anxiety and depression due to work problems are not common. 1 per cent of all employees had problems with anxiety and depression or felt down because of work.