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/en/arbeid-og-lonn/statistikker/aku/kvartal
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More women with full-time work
statistikk
2008-10-29T10:00:00.000Z
Labour market and earnings;Labour market and earnings;Immigration and immigrants
en
aku, Labour force survey, LFS, labour market, employees, unemployed, economically active, labour force, labour force status, employees by industry, underemployment, part-time work, hours of work, temporary staffUnemployment , Employment , Labour market and earnings, Labour market and earnings, Immigration and immigrants
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Labour force surveyQ3 2008

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More women with full-time work

The number of women working full time increased by 27 000 from the third quarter of 2007 to the third quarter of 2008. 60 per cent of the women and 87 per cent of the men, worked full time. The labour force participation rate for the working-age population was 74.3 per cent.

Full-time employment was up by approximately 55 000, 50 per cent of it among women. The share with full-time employment among women increased from the third quarter of 2007 to the third quarter of 2008, while it decreased for men. Average settled working hours for men were 37.3 hours per week, compared with 31.5 hours for women.

Higher participation rate

The labour force (the sum of employment and unemployment) increased by 86 000 people from the third quarter of 2007 to the third quarter of 2008. In the same period, the working-age population (aged 15–74) rose by 61 000. The labour force participation rate (the labour force in percent of the working-age population) was 70.9 per cent for women, up by 1.1 percentage point compared to the same quarter last year. For men, the labour force participation rate was 77.6 per cent, up 1.2 percentage point from the same quarter in 2007.

About 25 per cent of the growth in employment came from part time employment among young people in education. However, seasonally adjusted figures indicate that the lower growth in employment during 2008 mostly concern young people.

Growth in private and public service industries

From the third quarter of 2007 to the third quarter of 2008, employment rose by 83 000 people. Financial intermediation, health and social work and public administration and defence had the strongest growth in employment. About 75 per cent of the increase in total employment took place in those industries.

The number of employed people on temporary contracts down

In total, 221 000 were on temporary contracts in the third quarter of 2008, a reduction of 17 000 from the same quarter last year. Employed people on temporary contracts constituted 9.4 per cent of total employment, a reduction from 10.5 per cent in the third quarter last year. Hotels and restaurants, health and social work and education had the largest shares on temporary contracts. Those industries employed about half of all the people on temporary contracts.

Stable number of unemployed

According to the LFS, the number of unemployed was stable from the third quarter of 2007 to the third quarter of 2008. The increase in the LFS of 3 000 people is inside the error margin. The unemployment rate stood at 2.5 per cent.The number of registered unemployed with the Labour and Welfare Organisation showed a decline of 4 000 over the same period. The discrepancy between the two sources mainly comes from an increase in the number of unemployed in the LFS not found in the register with NAV.

Both the number of unemployed as well as the share of unemployed with short duration of job search (1–4 weeks) went up from the third quarter of 2007 to the third quarter of 2008. This may indicate an increase of the inflow to unemployment.

The number of underemployed down

Underemployment is employees with part-time as settled working hours who have tried to find more work. The number of underemployed was 59 000 in the third quarter of 2008, 6 000 people less than in the third quarter in 2007. In the third quarter of 2008, the underemployed represented 9.0 per cent of all part-time employees, down from 10.4 per cent in the same quarter in 2007.

When accounting for the fact that many unemployed and most underemployed are looking for less than full-time work, these two groups together wanted work equivalent to a total of 73 000 full-time positions in the third quarter of 2008 – about the same as in the third quarter of 2007.

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