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/en/arbeid-og-lonn/statistikker/aku/arkiv
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Number of employed people up by 81 000
statistikk
2007-02-07T10:00:00.000Z
Labour market and earnings;Labour market and earnings;Immigration and immigrants
en
aku, Labour force survey, LFS, labour market, employees, unemployed, economically active, labour force, labour force status, employees by industry, underemployment, part-time work, hours of work, temporary staffUnemployment , Employment , Labour market and earnings, Labour market and earnings, Immigration and immigrants
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Labour force surveyQ4 2006

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Number of employed people up by 81 000

The number of employed people increased by 81 000 from the fourth quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2006, according to new data from Statistics Norway's Labour Force Survey (LFS). The number of unemployed people fell by 37 000 during the same period.

Seasonally adjusted figures: The growth in employment continues

Adjusted for seasonal variations, unemployment decreased and the number of employed people increased from the third to the fourth quarter of 2006.

Adjustments for seasonal variations allow for the analysis of current developments in the labour market, and serve as an alternative to comparisons with the corresponding quarter in the previous year. Seasonally adjusted figures are presented in a separate article .

From the fourth quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2006, the number of employed people increased by 81 000, while the number of unemployed fell by 37 000. Thus the labour force (the employed plus the unemployed) increased by 44 000 people. This is slightly higher than the population growth: The working-age population (aged 16-74) increased by 39 000 over the same period.

The labour force participation rate is calculated by expressing the number of persons in the labour force as a percentage of the working-age population.

The labour force participation rate rose by 0.4 percentage points from the fourth quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2006. Both the female and the male participation rate increased. The labour force participation rate fell by 0.9 percentage points for younger people (aged 16-24) over the same period. This is partly due to a change in the age structure of this group: The share of the "youngest among the young" (aged 16-19) is on the increase, and this group normally has a lower participation rate. Among older people (aged 55-74), the participation rate increased by 2.6 percentage points and stood at 49.4 per cent - the highest level since the 1970s. Also for this group, a changing age structure made an impact: The share of the "youngest among the old" (aged 55-64) is increasing, and this group normally has a higher participation rate. However, it also appears that the participation rate is increasing when looking at one-year age groups, and hence, that the increased labour force participation rate among older people is not only due to a changing age structure within the group.

An important share of the total increase in employment came among people working part-time or short full-time schedules. While overall employment increased by 81 000 from the fourth quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2006, employment increased by 62 000 among people with 20 to 36 settled weekly working hours. Both full-time and part-time employment increased, but the growth was strongest in part-time employment. Nevertheless, average settled weekly working hours went up from 33.9 to 34.2. The increase in working time primarily took place among men as their settled weekly working hours were 37.4 on average in the fourth quarter of 2006, compared to 30.6 hours for women.

Workforce, employed and man-weeks worked. Seasonally adjusted figures in 1 000

For the sixth quarter in a row, financial intermediation and other business activities showed the strongest employment growth. Employment growth in the two industries amounted to 33 000 people from the fourth quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2006. Other business activities include legal, accounting, and auditing services, business and management consultancy, as well as temporary staffing agencies. There was also an increase within the construction industry, where employment rose by 14 000.

Of the total growth in employment, 79 per cent was in Oslo and Akershus counties (with an increase of 30 000) and in the four counties of Western Norway (with an increase of 34 000). The six counties account for half of all employment in Norway. (Oslo and Akershus account for 24 per cent of all employed, the counties of Western Norway for 26 per cent.)

Unemployment fell by 37 000

The number of unemployed fell by 37 000 from the fourth quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2006. The decline was strongest for young people (aged 16-24): In this age group unemployment fell by 14 000. The unemployment rate (unadjusted for seasonal variations) stood at 2.5 per cent; the male unemployment rate was 2.6 per cent, the female was 2.4 per cent. The number of registered unemployed with the Labour and Welfare Organisation showed a decline of 23 100 from the fourth quarter of 2005 to the fourth quarter of 2006.

The proportion of long-term unemployed - defined as persons who have been unemployed for at least six consecutive months - was 32 per cent in the fourth quarter of 2006, up 6 percentage points from the fourth quarter of 2005. The reason for the increased proportion of long-term unemployed is that the fall in unemployment mainly has taken place among people with shorter unemployment spells.

Unemployed (LFS), registered unemployed and registered employed + public sector job creation programmes. Seasonally adjusted figures in 1 000

The number of employees with temporary contracts up by 13 000

203 000 were on temporary employment contracts in the fourth quarter of 2006, an increase of 13 000 from the same quarter last year. 9.3 per cent of all employees were on temporary contracts, an increase of 0.4 percentage points from the last quarter of 2006. Temporary employment was most common within education (16 per cent of all employees), health and social work (15 per cent), and hotels and restaurants (14 per cent). At the opposite end of the scale, manufacturing (6 per cent) and transport and communication (5 per cent) are characterised by a relatively low share of temporary employees.

Number of underemployed unchanged

The number of underemployed, i.e. part-time employees who want to work more hours, was 97 000 in the fourth quarter of 2006, unchanged from the fourth quarter of 2005. The underemployed represent 15.0 per cent of all part-time employees, down 0.8 percentage points from the fourth quarter of 2005.

When accounting for the fact that many unemployed and most underemployed are looking for less than full-time work, these two groups together wanted work equivalent to a total of 84 000 full-time positions in the fourth quarter of 2006 - 31 000 less than in the fourth quarter of 2005.

Changes in the LFS from 2006

With effect from January 2006, some improvements have been made in the Norwegian LFS. This makes the employment and unemployment figures more comparable with figures from the EU-countries. In addition, actual working hours will be measured more accurately. Therefore, the changes have lead to a level shift in the LFS figures. Much of the shift can be adjusted for in the figures, and therefore, we have made two sets of figures for the fourth quarter of 2006 in the various tables. In the text above, changes (from the same quarter last year) refer to the data set containing the figures according to the LFS prior to the changes. For more details on the LFS, the seasonal adjustment method and the changes in the LFS, you can click on the links at the left side of this page.

(1) The figures for underemployment in 2006 are incorrect. More information is available here .

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