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66195
Largest increase among the young
statistikk
2012-03-01T10:00:00.000Z
Elections;Immigration and immigrants
en
vundkinnv, Municipal and county council election, electoral survey among immigrants, electoral turnout, voters with immigrant backgroundsMunicipal council and county council elections, Elections, Immigration and immigrants, Elections
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Municipal and county council election, electoral survey among immigrants2011

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The statistics is publised together with Municipal and county council election, electoral survey. There you will find updated figures.

Largest increase among the young

Among Norwegian citizens who are immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, 43 per cent participated in the local elections last year. Thirty-two per cent of the foreign citizens entitled to vote participated. The voter turnout has increased among young eligible voters.

Municipal and county council elections 2011. Electoral turnout in per cent among the sample of immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents with Norwegian citizenship. By country background and sex.

The voter turnout among the youngest electors is low compared to other age groups in 2011. However, the young eligible voters see the largest increase in voter turnout. Participation increases by 6 percentage points to 29 per cent among immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents aged 18-25 years. The group aged 26-39 years also increases its voter turnout, by 5 percentage points. Eligible voters aged 60 years and above see their turnout decrease by 5 percentage points, but this group still has the highest total turnout, with 55 per cent.

Turnout increases for young eligible voters with a background from Africa

When the increase in turnout is classified by age group, young eligible voters with an African background stand out. Among these, and in the age group 18-25 years, the increase here is approximately 8 percentage points, while the total increase is 17 percentage points for the group 26-39 years. The youngest eligible voters from Eritrea have the highest turnout among the selected countries with 56 per cent. Certainly this is a small group of eligible voters, but their turnout increased by 33 percentage points from the elections in 2007.

Municipal and county council elections 2011. Electoral turnout in per cent among the sample of immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents with Norwegian citizenship. By country background, sex and selected countries.

Small changes in the voter turnout in total

In total for the elections in 2011, compared with the 2003 and 2007 elections, there was only a moderate increase in the voter turnout among immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrants. Among foreign citizens eligible to vote, the turnout has decreased by 5 percentage points since the elections in 2007 - after a small increase in 2007 compared to 2003. In the population as a whole, the turnout in the last two local elections increased by a total of 5 percentage points, and the voter turnout is now 64.5 per cent.

Higher voter turnout among immigrants from Africa than from Europe

Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrants with an African background have a higher turnout than those with a European background - 47 per cent and 42 per cent respectively. The turnout is particularly low among eligible voters with a background from non-EU/EEA countries. Only 29 per cent of eligible voters from this group cast their vote.

Municipal and county council elections 2011. Electoral turnout in per cent among the sample of foreign citizens entitled to vote. By citizenship and sex.

Immigrants from the Balkans have a particularly low voter turnout. Among immigrants from Kosovo and Macedonia, only 18 and 23 per cent cast their vote. The turnout among immigrants from Sri Lanka is 57 per cent in last year’s elections. This is the highest turnout by eligible immigrant voters with a background outside Europe, followed by immigrants with a background from Pakistan and Somalia with a 50 per cent turnout. Since 2007, eligible voters with a background from Morocco and Somalia have the largest increase in voter turnout at 20 and 13 percentage points respectively. The decrease is largest for eligible voters with a background from Russia, at 7 percentage points.

Among foreign citizens eligible to vote, those with a background from Holland or Somalia have the highest turnout with 56 per cent and 51 per cent respectively. Eligible voters with Somalian citizenship have seen the largest increase in voter turnout since the local elections in 2007, with 15 percentage points.

Large increase in turnout for immigrants with a short period of residency

Immigrants and Norwegian-born with immigrant parents with the longest period of residency have the highest turnout in elections. Eligible voters with a period of residency exceeding 30 years have a turnout of 58 per cent at the elections last year. At the elections in 2007, the voter turnout successively increased with the period of residency, but in 2011, eligible voters with a short period of residency stand out. Eligible voters with a period of residency from 0 to 9 years have a higher turnout than eligible voters with a period of residency from 10 to 19 years. Immigrants with the shortest period of residency have increased their turnout by 10 percentage points since the previous elections, and now have a turnout of 41 per cent.

Municipal and county council elections 2011. Electoral turnout in per cent among the sample of foreign citizens entitled to vote. By citizenship, sex and selected countries.

Higher turnout for women

As in 2007, women have a higher turnout than men. Differences in the voter turnout between the sexes are largest for immigrants with a background from Oceania, EU/EEA countries and South America. Among eligible voters with a background from Oceania, the figure for those who cast their vote is 14 percentage points higher for men than women, and 6 percentage points higher for women than men from EU/EEA countries and South America.

 

Among immigrants with a background from Thailand, the voter turnout for women is 30 percentage points higher than for men. Also, among eligible voters with a background from Russia, the figure for those who cast their vote is 16 percentage points higher for women than men. Eligible male voters with a background from Iraq and Bosnia-Herzegovina have an 10 and 8 percentage point higher turnout respectively than the women.

The basis for the statistics

These figures are based on a survey of the electoral rolls for the municipal and county council elections in 2011. A sample of 6 800 persons was drawn from the electoral roll for the 182 300 persons with a background as an immigrant or Norwegian-born to immigrant parents. In addition, a sample of 6 500 persons was drawn from the electoral roll for the 206 700 foreign citizens eligible to vote. Additional information about eligible voters can be found at About the statistics . The survey has been commissioned by the Ministry of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion.

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