19506
/en/natur-og-miljo/statistikker/avfregno/arkiv
19506
Reduced amounts for the first time in 2009
statistikk
2010-10-27T10:00:00.000Z
Nature and the environment
en
avfregno, Waste accounts, waste, waste treatment, waste sources, types of waste, material segregation, source segregation, household waste, trade wasteWaste , Nature and the environment
false

Waste accounts1995-2007

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Reduced amounts for the first time in 2009

In Norway, 10.4 million tonnes of waste were generated in 2009, down 5 per cent from the previous year. This is the first time since the waste accounts began that the waste amounts fell. A total of 78 per cent of the waste being handled in known ways was recovered, excluding hazardous waste.

These are results from Statistics Norway’s new estimations on waste generation and handling in industries and households. The figures for 2009 and 2008 are preliminary.

In addition, 1.3 million tonnes of slightly polluted matter from construction work were deposited at landfill sites.

The waste amounts dropped more than the GDP (fixed prices), which fell by 1 per cent in the same period. A Norwegian national target set by the authorities in 1999 has been to bring the growth in waste amounts to a level that is considerably lower than the economic growth, expressed by GDP. The overall waste growth since 1995 was 41 per cent, while the GDP grew 40 per cent.

The waste amounts from households declined 2 per cent from 2008 to 2009, while the decline in industrial waste was somewhat steeper in the same period, at 5 per cent. This is consistent with the development in recent years, where the household waste comprises an increasingly bigger share of the total waste amount. Households now generate 21 per cent of all waste in Norway (Corrected 28.10.2010).

Trends in waste and GDP (constant prices). Final figures 1995-2007, preliminary figures 2008 and 2009. 1995 = 1.

Non-hazardous waste in Norway, by method of treatment. Final figures 1995-2007, preliminary figures 2008 and 2009. Per cent of known handling.

Less degradable material going to landfill

The amount of landfilled waste declined by 11 per cent to 1.9 million tonnes in 2009, of which 0.5 million tonnes was organic matter that decomposes and generates methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The amount of degradable material going to landfill dropped by as much as 18 per cent in 2009, partly due to a ban on the landfilling of bio-degradable waste entering into force on 1 July 2009, and increased export to Sweden for incineration. The slightly polluted matter from construction work comes in addition.

Hazardous waste disposed of at specially engineered landfills was by far the biggest portion, making up slightly more than one third of the landfilled volumes. The remaining amounts were concrete, glass, plastic, etc., which degrades very slowly in the landfills. The split of landfilled waste by material is somewhat uncertain due to a limited data basis.

6.0 million tonnes of non-hazardous waste were sent for recovery in 2009, comprising 78 per cent of all non-hazardous waste this year. This recovery rate has been fairly stable since 2006. Recycling comprised 3.2 million tonnes, or 40 per cent, while energy recovery counted for 25 per cent. The remainder was either biologically treated (e.g. composting) or used as filling compound or cover material at landfills. The recycled share of the total recovery dropped slightly in 2009, while the other recovery forms increased accordingly. Hazardous waste and waste handled in other or unknown ways are excluded from the estimation of recovery rates.

The recovery level varies considerably between the different materials, due to the feasibility of producing useful raw material from the sorted waste, and the market situation for the raw material. As metals and paper have had high recovery rates for several years, and reached 92 and 80 per cent in 2009 respectively, the share of plastics sent for recovery reached 57 per cent the same year.

Decline in all materials

Non-hazardous waste in Norway, by method of treatment. Final figures 1995-2007, preliminary figures 2008 and 2009. Million tonnes.

All material types showed reduced amounts in 2009, with concrete and bricks having the greatest reduction by approximately 13 per cent from the previous year due to reduced building activity. Wet-organic waste was still the largest material portion in 2009, with 1.7 million tonnes. The overall amount of wet-organic waste dropped 3 per cent from the previous year, and the landfilled amount dropped as much as 21 per cent.

The hazardous waste amount showed an increase from 1995 by 67 per cent, but a decline of approximately 6 per cent from the previous year. Incomplete registering of hazardous waste in the beginning of the period may be an important reason. The preliminary estimation of hazardous waste volumes in 2009 is regarded to be somewhat uncertain.

The amount of paper waste has declined in recent years, and was 5 per cent lower in 2009 than in 2007.

Waste in Norway by source. Final figures 1995-2007, preliminary figures 2008 and 2009. 1995 = 1.

Less waste from building activity

Waste from construction and demolition industries fell by 15 per cent to 1.2 million tonnes in 2009, excluding clean and slightly polluted soils and rocks. The trend after 2004 is somewhat uncertain, but is believed to be as shown in figure 2 based on the annual amount of built area.

The service industries generated 1.9 million tonnes of waste in 2009, comprising 18 per cent of the total national amounts. This includes waste arising from waste handling. This is down 2 per cent from the previous year, but up as much as 85 per cent since 1995. About half the waste was delivered as mixed waste.

The waste amounts in the manufacturing industries are estimated at 3.9 million tonnes in 2009, which is down 4 per cent from 2008. This makes up 37 per cent of the national waste total. About three quarters of this stemmed from production processes.

Due to a new classification standard for industries, businesses belonging to the category of waste recovery have moved from manufacturing to service industries.

Waste in Norway, by material (final figures 1995-2007, preliminary figures 2008 and 2009), source and material (2008*) and treatment and material (2008*). 1 000 tonnes
  Total1 Paper, cardboard
and pasteboard
Metals Plastics Glas Wood waste Textiles Wet organic waste Concrete and bricks Sludge Other Hazardous waste
1995 7 342  887        919       327       189 1 328  109 1 070  533  328 1 020  632
1996 7 488  980  956  349  179 1 327  113 1 086  554  323  997  625
1997 7 654  976  959  360  182 1 300  115 1 112  571  329 1 134  617
1998 8 002 1 009  945  366  189 1 301  116 1 182  655  328 1 303  609
1999 8 182 1 031  934  374  191 1 263  115 1 236  669  334 1 432  601
2000 8 408 1 081  936  380  198 1 311  113 1 270  658  344 1 445  672
2001 8 555 1 071  940  388  208 1 367  112 1 302  690  357 1 477  642
2002 8 722 1 060  935  400  219 1 420  111 1 363  697  371 1 490  658
2003 9 011 1 017  953  414  232 1 438  111 1 349  657  381 1 593  867
2004 9 141 1 092  994  426  231 1 385  113 1 413  634  384 1 542  927
2005 9 747 1 177 1 054  437  251 1 481  116 1 490  739  408 1 627  966
2006 10 109 1 226 1 097  467  254 1 471  118 1 628  687  380 1 695 1 085
2007 10 739 1 235 1 105  492  278 1 626  124 1 743  821  401 1 836 1 077
2008* 10 858 1 188 1 134  507  281 1 664  130 1 778  804  404 1 845 1 123
2009* 10 400 1 200 1 100  510  270 1 600  130 1 700  700  390 1 700 1 100
                         
By source and material (2008*)                        
Total 10 858 1 188 1 134  507  281 1 664  130 1 778  804  404 1 845 1 123
Households2 2 186  475  205  153 79  372 52  555 3 0  262 28
Agriculture, forestry and fishing  145 7 12 22 41 41 4 97 0 0 41 2
Mining and quarrying  206 10 23 4 41 11 41 8 8 0 9  130
Manufacturing 4 031  205  222 69 49  763 12  700  134  296  950  632
Electricity, gas and water supply 49 1 4 41 0 2 0 41 1 0 1 37
Construction 1 461 19 62 15 83  237 44 428  655 0  344 13
Service industries 1 947  471  140  155 53  208 446  389 4  107  277 95
Other or unspecified  834 0  466 88 15 69 11 0 0 0 0  186
                         
By treatment/disposal and material (2008*)3                        
Total 10 858 1 188 1 134  507  281 1 664  130 1 778  804  404 1 845 1 123
Sorted for material recovery 3 388  676 1 033 71  109  414 12  539  100  102  279 52
Biological treatment  455 0 0 0 0  152 0  235 0 69 0 0
Energy recovery 2 056  177 0  146 0  828 44  420 0  122  206  112
Filling compound and cover material  530 7 0 0 412 15 0 26 444 14  411 0
Incineration without energy recovery  464 52 439 41 450 73 13  126 0 0 24 46
Landfill 2 123  189 37  156  110  182 52  191  240 39  247  679
Other final treatment  234 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  234
Other or unspecified 1 608 86 25 93 0 0 7  241  419 58  677 0
1  The waste amount from ships and big constructions, as oil platforms, are counted as the average for the whole period from 1995 to 2009.
2  Includes scrapped cars and motor bikes, and paper burnt at home.
3  Exported waste is categorised according to the treatment or disposal it undergoes in the destination country, insofar this treatment or disposal method is known. Exported waste for which the treatment or disposal method is unknown, is categorised as unknown or unspecified. Imported waste is not covered by the statistics.
4  The figure was corrected 27 October 2010 at 14:15 p.m.