6175
/en/befolkning/statistikker/fobstud/hvert-10-aar
6175
60 per cent of students live alone
statistikk
2002-11-21T10:00:00.000Z
Population;Construction, housing and property;Education
en
fobstud, Population and housing census. Students' place of residence and housing conditions (discontinued), students' actual place of residence, students living away from home, household types, size of household, building types (for example detached house, terrace housing, block), tenure status, dwelling size, dwelling standard, private cars, parking spaces, garagesTertiary education, Dwelling and housing conditions , Population and housing censuses , Population, Construction, housing and property, Education
true

Population and housing census. Students' place of residence and housing conditions (discontinued)2001

The statistics has been discontinued.

Content

Published:

60 per cent of students live alone

A clear majority lives alone, rents their dwelling and live in cramped conditions. Moreover they have considerably less access to housing facilities such as garden, balcony, terrace, etc.

This is illustrated by figures from the Population and housing census 2001.

There were 104 000 pupils and students, (here referred to as students) that applied for accommodation grants (for those who move away from home for studies) from the State Education Loan Fund and were registered as studying in Norway in the autumn of 2001. 80 per cent of these stated that they had moved from their parents dwelling to another dwelling. 20 per cent still lived at their formal home address. This survey, which is the first of its kind, describes the housing situation of students who stated that they lived away from their parental home.

A clear majority of the students live alone

More than 60 per cent of the students living away from home live alone. This figure is clearly higher than for the rest of the population in the same age group where over 30 per cent respond that they live alone. The female students, to a greater degree, tend to live together with others than the male students. Whereas 41 per cent of the females live in households of two or more persons, the figure is 33 per cent for males. This tendency is the same in all age groups.

About 15 per cent of the students live in what we may refer to as student communes; 3 or more persons living in the household.

Few student households with children

About 40 per cent of the students living away from home live in households of several persons. However only 3 per cent of the students live in households with children. Here too, the students clearly distinguish themselves from others in the same age group where almost 40 per cent live in households with children.

In the large cities, with high densities of student population, such as Oslo, Bergen and Trondheim, there tends to be a higher proportion of households composed of several persons when compared to other cities with student population. However, a lower proportion of these households have children (about 1 per cent).

9 out of 10 students rent the dwelling in which they live

Barely 10 per cent of the students living away from home own the dwelling in which they live. The proportion owning is somewhat higher in the oldest age groups, but still low (below 15 per cent). Of those renting their dwelling, it is clear that the majority rents from private persons (almost 60 per cent). 13 per cent rent through a housing company while only 1 per cent rent from the municipality. The figures are in stark contrast to others in the same age group, the majority of whom live in owned dwellings (56 per cent).

A relatively high proportion of the students live in detached dwellings (45 per cent). However most of these students live in bedsitters located in detached houses. About 35 per cent live in flats/blocks of flats or commercial buildings with several dwellings. Naturally, the proportion living in flats/blocks of flats is greatest in the large cities.

Students live in cramped conditions

On the whole, students live in more cramped dwellings than others of the same age group. They live in dwellings with fewer rooms and have less area at their disposal. As much as 63 per cent of the students live in dwellings with one or two rooms. 35 per cent live in dwellings with only one room. Compared with the corresponding age group in the population, 29 per cent live in one or two-room flats. Only 9 per cent live in one-room flats. As much as 43 per cent of the students live in dwellings that are smaller than 40 m2. The corresponding figure for others in the same age group is 9 per cent.

1 out of 4 students does not have access to a kitchen

About 25 per cent of the students do not have access to a kitchen. However, most of them have access to a communal kitchen so that only 1 per cent has absolutely no access to facilities for cooking their own food. Most of the students have access to bathroom and WC.

35 per cent of the students have neither access to a garden, communal garden, balcony, veranda nor terrace. The corresponding figure for others in the same age group is 11 per cent. A relatively high proportion of students have access to a communal garden (34 per cent), while only 1 out of 5 has a garden. In the larger cities with high densities of student population, it is natural to find many lacking these housing facilities. Almost 45 per cent of the students in Bergen have neither access to their own garden, communal garden, balcony, veranda nor terrace. In Trondheim and Oslo the figures are respectively 40 and 35 per cent.

Few students have their own car

Barely 14 per cent of the student households have a car available for their use. This is a considerably lower proportion than in the same age group where 62 per cent have a car available for their use. Among the largest municipalities with high population of students, the proportion of student households with a car available for their use is highest in Ås (28 per cent) and lowest in Bergen (below 10 per cent).

Tables: