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Larger households among non-western immigrants
statistikk
2002-09-09T10:00:00.000Z
Population;Immigration and immigrants;Population
en
fobinv, Population and housing census. Immigrant households (discontinued), household types (for example single, couples with children, couples without children), private households, multi-family households, size of household, households, married couples, cohabitants, country backgroundPopulation, Children, families and households, Population and housing censuses , Immigration and immigrants, Population
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Population and housing census. Immigrant households (discontinued)2001

The statistics has been discontinued.

Content

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Larger households among non-western immigrants

Every third immigrant from Africa or Asia lives in a household of 5 or more persons while only every seventh person of non-immigrant background lives in such a large household. There are few immigrants cohabiting and it is more common for them to live in multiple-family households. There are, however, great differences among the immigrant groups.

This is illustrated by figures from the Population and housing census 2001.

Great differences between immigrant groups

There are considerable differences among immigrants, depending on the country and part of the world they come from. Generally, it can be said that the differences mentioned above are accentuated when we look at African and Asian countries. On the other hand, the distribution of households among western European countries in particular is similar to that of persons of non-immigrant background.

There are also considerable differences among immigrants from Asian countries and immigrants from African countries. Immigrants from Asia largely live in traditional nuclear families. 56 per cent belong to the category ”couple with children” versus about 40 per cent among persons from Africa. More than 60 per cent of immigrants from Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Turkey belong to this category. Immigrants from Asian countries also have the highest proportion of multiple-family households (11 per cent).

Number of persons per private household

Among immigrants from African countries we find many in the categories ”living alone” and ”single mother/father with children”. 24 per cent of persons from African countries live alone and 17 per cent belong to the group ”single mother/father with children”. Corresponding figures for persons of non-immigrant background are respectively 16 and 6 per cent. Almost 30 per cent of immigrants from Somalia are in the category ”single mother/father with children”.

The immigrant population tends to be younger than the population of non-immigrant background. This accentuates some of the differences we see between the groups with regard to distribution into household types.

Larger households are common among immigrants of non-western background

On the whole, non-western immigrants live in larger households than persons without immigrant background and other immigrant groups. Among persons originating from African or Asian countries, respectively 34 and 36 per cent live in households of 5 or more persons. Corresponding figures for persons of non-immigrant background and persons of European background are 17 and 15 per cent respectively. Persons of Pakistani background have the highest proportion with almost 60 per cent living in households of 5 or more persons.

Even though non-western immigrant households are generally larger, we also find high figures for persons living alone in this group. However, there are great differences that are largely due to reason for immigration, duration of residence in Norway and age structure in these groups. About 30 per cent of persons from Ethiopia, Somalia and Iraq live alone, while the corresponding figure for the whole immigrant group is 18 per cent. Corresponding figures among Pakistanis and Turks are respectively 7 and 8 per cent. Ethiopians, Somalians and Iraqis all have a relatively short duration of residence in Norway and often came alone to the country as refugees. Both Turks and Pakistanis belong to the groups with the longest duration of residence in Norway.

Twice as common to live in a household with several families

The proportion living in multiple-family households, i.e. households of two or more families, is more than twice as much for non-western immigrants in comparison with persons of non-immigrant background. Only 4 per cent of the latter group live in multiple-family households while the corresponding figure for non-western immigrants is 10 per cent. Multiple-family households are most common among persons from Pakistan, India and Vietnam.

Few cohabitants among immigrants of non-western background

There are few persons cohabiting among African and Asian immigrants. Whereas about 12 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background and European immigrants above the age of 20 are cohabitants, the figure for Asian and African immigrants is respectively 3 and 4 per cent. Cohabitation among European immigrants is most common among persons from Sweden - 21 per cent - while it is rather seldom among persons from Yugoslavia and Bosnia- Herzegovina (6 and 4 per cent).

There are fewer variations among African and Asian immigrants. There is almost no cohabitation - less than 1 per cent - among persons from Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Establish themselves earlier

Immigrants of non-western background are earlier in establishing themselves in a relationship than persons of non-immigrant background. Whereas 30 per cent of persons of non-western background aged 20-24 years were in a relationship, the corresponding figure for persons of non-immigrant background was 16 per cent. When non-western immigrants enter a relationship, they get married while persons of non-immigrant background cohabit. Whereas only 3 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background aged 20-24 were married, 26 per cent of immigrants of non-western background were married.

Non-western immigrants live in blocks of flats

There are obvious differences between the type of housing immigrants and persons of non-immigrant background live in. To push this comparison to the extreme, we could say that Norwegians live in detached houses while non-western immigrants live in flats. We find this tendency irrespective of whether we look at central or less central municipalities. Whereas 54 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background live in detached houses in the most central municipalities, only 19 per cent of non-western immigrants live in detached houses. In the least central municipalities the corresponding figures are 87 and 60 per cent respectively.

There are considerable differences between the immigrant groups. Western immigrants have a pattern of living that is more similar to the norm in Norway. The proportion living in a detached house is notably higher among these immigrants than among non-western immigrants.

Fewer persons of immigrant background live in owner-occupied dwellings

Whereas 84 per cent of persons of non-immigrant backgrounds live in owner-occupied dwellings, the corresponding figure for immigrants is 59 per cent. Here too, there are great differences between the immigrant groups. Whereas only 19 per cent of immigrants from Iraq and Afghanistan live in owner-occupied dwellings, 74 per cent of persons originating from India and 67 per cent originating from Pakistan live in owner-occupied dwellings. It is reasonable to presume that duration of residence in Norway is of importance for whether one owns or rents a dwelling.

Persons of immigrant background are defined as persons born abroad by two foreign-born parents (first-generation immigrants) and persons born in Norway by two foreign-born parents. The latter group is born in Norway while both parents and all four grandparents are born abroad.

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