143790
/en/sosiale-forhold-og-kriminalitet/statistikker/politi_statres/aar
143790
More resources and higher activity
statistikk
2013-12-03T10:00:00.000Z
Social conditions, welfare and crime
en
politi_statres, Police and prosecution - StatRes (discontinued), central government performance, activities and results, total expenditure, own production, contracted man-years, reports, investigation, detection rateCrime and justice, Social conditions, welfare and crime
true

Police and prosecution - StatRes (discontinued)2012

The statistics has been discontinued.

Content

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More resources and higher activity

Operating expenses for the police and prosecution authority totalled NOK 14.2 billion in 2012, which is NOK 621 million more than the year before. The number of man-years increased somewhat more than the population growth, and the indicators for 2012 suggest a higher level of activity in the areas of criminal cases and immigration administration than in 2011.

StatRes. Police and prosecution. Own production and contracted man-years adjusted for long term leaves. Absolute figures
2012
Own production (mill. NOK)14 226.8
Contracted man-years adjusted for long term leaves, total13 983

The police and prosecution authority’s expenses for own production was NOK 14 227 million in 2012. This is 4.4 per cent more than in 2011. In total, wage costs were NOK 9 861 million and expenses for purchasing goods and services were NOK 4 366 million. This is 4 per cent and 5.2 per cent more than the year before respectively.

Expense development differs in police districts and in other units

In total, the share of own production expenses used for wage costs was 69.3 per cent in 2012, which is about the same as the year before. For the police districts in total, however, wage costs made up 77 per cent of own production, while the equivalent share for other units within the police and prosecution authority was 49 per cent.

In total, the 27 police districts’ expenses for own production totalled NOK10 240 million in 2012, which is 3.7 per cent more than the year before. For the police districts, expenses for the purchase of goods and services were 6.7 per cent higher than in 2011, while wage costs increased by 2.8 per cent. Correspondingly, for other units in the police and prosecution authority, expenses from purchasing goods and services increased by 3.5 per cent and wage costs increased by as much as 9 per cent from 2011 to 2012.

Highest increase for Oslo Police District

There are relatively large differences between the different police districts in the development of expenses from 2011 to 2012. In Oslo Police District, wage costs increased by 6 per cent, while expenses from purchasing goods and services increased by more than 14 per cent. Thus, the increase in expenses for Oslo Police District equals nearly half of the total increase in own production for all of the police districts combined.

More man-years both in police positions and in units other than police districts

In total, there was 13 983 contracted man-years adjusted for long term leave in the police and prosecution authority in 2012. Compared to the same reference period the year before, there were 302 more man-years in 2012, of which 164 were man-years in police positions – i.e. qualified police personnel with certain job codes.

In 2012, there were 11 472 man-years in the police districts and 2 511 man-years in other units. This is 1.6 and 4.8 per cent more than the year before respectively. Thus, out of all man-years, the share of man-years in the police districts was further reduced. The statistics are comparable in the period 2008-2012, and this share is reduced from 85.3 per cent to 82 per cent in this time span.

There were 7 941 man-years in police positions in 2012, which is 2.1 per cent more than the year before. The police districts had the majority in this man-year category, with 7 211, which is 130 more man-years than in the same reference period in 2011. More detailed figures on man-years indicate that the reallocation of man-years that happened in 2011 has now been reversed. There was, nevertheless, an increase in Oslo Police District in 2012 compared to the year before, with 41 more man-years in police positions and 29 more man-years in other positions.

Man-years increased more than the population growth

In 2012, there were in total 2.8 man-years in the police and prosecution authority per 1 000 population. Statistics Norway has comparable statistics dating back to 2005, and the 2012 level is the highest ever to be recorded. Relative to the population growth, man-years in police positions have more stable figures, and as in each of the preceding years of these statistics, there were 1.6 man-years per 1 000 population in police positions in 2012.

Increase in offences reported to the police indicates higher activity

The statistics on offences reported to the police show that the police and prosecution authority registered in total 394 000 offences in 2012, of which nearly 274 000 were crimes. This is 3.6 per cent and 3.5 per cent more than the year before respectively. More registered offences for profit and narcotic offences, especially in Oslo, contributed to a big share of these increases.

Narcotic offences and traffic misdemeanours are for the most part discovered, and thus reported, by the police. The fact that these groups of offences increased by 7.3 per cent and 6.3 per cent respectively, therefore indicates that the police’s control activity increased in 2012. Furthermore, more offences of violence and sexual offences were reported in 2012 than in 2011. These are prioritised areas, and the increase may indicate a higher level of activity in the police and prosecution authority in relation to these types of criminal cases. Additionally, 4.7 per cent more thefts and other types of offences for profit were reported, in turn contributing to the registration of 13 500 more offences in 2012 compared to the year before.

The police’s civilian work

In addition to criminal case-related work, the police and prosecution authority have many other tasks, including tasks within administration and civil administration of justice at elementary level. For example, through the enforcement officer, the police received 5 000 applications for debt settlements and over 257 000 applications for writ of execution in 2012. The number of applications for debt settlements was about the same as the year before, while applications for writ of execution saw a 6.2 per cent increase.

More cases in immigration administration

Both the police and other units receive and process many cases concerning immigration administration. In 2012, the police in total received 184 700 applications and other cases in this area. This was 7.7 per cent more than in 2011, and the increase was significant for many of the underlying types of cases. In 2012, other types of cases included 67 500 cases of registering EEA nationals and 29 500 applications for family reunification. This was 12.2 per cent and 7.7 per cent more than the year before respectively. The police also received 15 300 applications for Norwegian citizenship, which was as much as 15.1 per cent more than in 2011. Additionally, the police executed 4 902 forced returns; 3.3 per cent more than in 2011.

Disparities between Statistics Norway and the National Police Directorate’s figures for police man-yearsOpen and readClose

Disparities between Statistics Norway and the National Police Directorate’s man-year figures are mainly due to the different methods used to calculate man-years. The Directorate’s figures are based on man-year ceilings and also include vacant posts. These are not included in Statistics Norway’s figures. Furthermore, persons who are posted to the Directorate or the Norwegian Police University College, and persons posted abroad also contribute to the discrepancy in the figures. The definition of police man-years is based on specified job codes. Finally, Statistics Norway adjusts the man-year figures for long-term leave, which contributes to Statistics Norway’s figures being somewhat lower than the Directorate’s own figures on police coverage.