33258
/en/varehandel-og-tjenesteyting/statistikker/engrosavanse/hvert-10-aar
33258
18 per cent gross earnings
statistikk
2000-12-19T10:00:00.000Z
Wholesale and retail trade and service activities
en
engrosavanse, Wholesale earnings survey (discontinued), commodities, enterprises, sales revenues, commodity costs, gross profit, industrial classification, product groupsWholesale and retail trade , Wholesale and retail trade and service activities
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Wholesale earnings survey (discontinued)1998

The statistics has been discontinued.

Content

Published:

18 per cent gross earnings

Norwegian wholesalers made gross earnings of 18 per cent on merchandise sold in 1998. This is somewhat lower than the results of a similar survey 13 years ago, when gross earnings were 20 per cent.

Although the local kind-of-activity units had somewhat lower gross earnings in 1998 than in 1985, there are large differences between the various industries. Some industries have increased their gross earnings, while others have seen a reduction. A big decline was seen in furniture wholesaling. Gross earnings on the sale of furniture fell from 29 per cent in 1985 to 13 per cent in 1998. There has been less of a decline for wholesalers of food, beverages and tobacco, whose gross earnings fell from 12 per cent in 1985 to 10 per cent in 1998. Wholesale of motor vehicles has virtually the same gross earnings on sales of motor vehicles for both years, with 13 and 12 per cent. There are several industries in which gross earnings have increased considerably. One is the wholesale of clothing and shoes, where gross earnings increased from 23 and 15 per cent in 1985 to 29 and 23 per cent respectively in 1998. Further comparisons between the two years are difficult, as the industry standard for the two surveys is different. In addition, the definition of sales income is somewhat different in the two surveys. In 1985 special duties were included in the sales income, whereas now they are deducted. Similarly, public subsidies were not included in sales income in 1985, whereas they were included in 1998. There is no difference in the definition of gross earnings in the two surveys. Gross earnings means the difference between sales income and the product cost of sold merchandise. Special duties are not included in gross earnings, while public subsidies are.

The 17 818 wholesalers sold NOK 463 billion worth of goods in 1998. Cost of goods amounted to NOK 379 billion, while gross earnings were NOK 84 billion. These amounts do not include VAT.

Lowest gross earnings on food, beverages and tobacco

Gross earnings on food, beverages and tobacco came to 10.4 per cent in 1998, the lowest of all main product groups. Sales totalled NOK 123.6 billion. Of this sum non-specialized wholesale of food, beverages and tobacco came to NOK 44.4 billion, with gross earnings at 10.6 per cent. Gross earnings were highest on sales of non-alcoholic wines, liqueur and spirit essences (21.2 per cent on sales of NOK 155 billion), sales of fresh vegetables, potatoes, fruit and berries (20.2 per cent on sales of NOK 2.2 billion), and sales of animal fodder (20 per cent on sales of NOK 769 million). The lowest gross earnings were on tobacco products (2.6 per cent on sales of NOK 979 million), ice cream (5.2 per cent on sales of NOK 239 million) and sales of wine and spirits (6.1 per cent on sales of NOK 706 million).

Highest gross earnings on clothing

Clothing sales had the highest gross earnings of any main product group in 1998. Gross earnings for clothing were 28.3 per cent, while sales income totalled NOK 11.3 billion. Of these sales the industry subclass wholesale of clothing accounted for 78 per cent, with gross earnings at 28.9 per cent.

In the industry subclass wholesale of clothes, gross earnings on sales of sports and leisure clothing were 39.4 per cent in 1998, the highest in this industry subclass. Almost as high was the gross earnings on the sale of underwear, T-shirts, socks, tights, gloves and similar clothing, at 38.6 per cent. Sales income for these two product groups was NOK 1.3 and NOK 1.4 billion respectively. Wholesale of womens clothing came to NOK 2.4 billion and mens clothing NOK 1.9 billion in 1998, with gross earnings of 28.4 and 22.4 per cent respectively. Sales of clothes for young people amounted to NOK 1.1 billion, with gross earnings of 18.9 per cent.

23.5 per cent for footwear

In 1998 gross earnings on sales of footwear were 23.5 per cent, with total shoe sales totalling NOK 2.4 billion this year. In the industry subclass wholesale of footwear gross earnings were 22.7 per cent. Local kind-of-activity units with this industry code had 77.3 per cent of all shoe sales.

17.7 per cent for furniture

The main product group furniture showed gross earnings of 17.7 per cent in 1998, with a turnover of NOK 5.6 billion. Of this turnover, wholesale of furniture and furnishings was 64.5 per cent, and gross earnings were 13 per cent. Highest sales income in the product group furniture in this industry subclass was for lounge suites and coffee tables, with sales income of NOK 1.1 billion and gross earnings of 12.4 per cent. Excluding the product group other furniture, kitchen furniture had the highest gross earnings, with 16.3 per cent. Sales income for this product group was NOK 129 million. The lowest gross earnings were on bedroom furniture, with 7.6 per cent on sales of NOK 190 million. Bookcases, wall sections, chests of drawers and other storage furniture had nearly equally low gross earnings, with 7.7 per cent on sales of NOK 316 million. Gross earnings were also extremely low on furniture for children and teenagers, with 7.9 per cent on sales of NOK 62 million.

18.4 per cent on electrical household appliances

Total gross earnings on electrical household appliances were 18.4 per cent on sales of NOK 7.5 billion. Wholesalers of electrical household appliances had 76 per cent of these sales, and gross earnings of 16.4 per cent.

14.1 per cent for computers and computer equipment

Turnover of computers and computer equipment amounted to NOK 36.3 billion, with gross earnings of 14.1 per cent in 1998. Wholesalers of office machines and equipment claimed 90.2 per cent of these sales, and gross earnings of 13.9 per cent on the sale of this type of goods. Turnover of computers was the highest, with NOK 19.9 billion. In return, gross earnings for this product group were 11.4 per cent, which was the lowest for computers and computer equipment in this industry class. Monitors, printers and computer equipment sales mounted to NOK 4.9 billion, with gross earnings of 15 per cent. Other gross earning and sales in this industry class were: servers and/multi-user machines, 18.7 per cent on sales of NOK 2.3 billion; software, 26.5 per cent on sales of NOK 2.2 billion; and network products, 14.1 per cent on sales of NOK 2.4 billion.

18.4 per cent for telecommunications equipment and office machinery

Sales of telecommunications equipment and office machinery gave Norwegian local kind-of-activity units sales of NOK 7.5 billion and gross earnings of 18.4 per cent in 1998. Wholesalers of office machines and equipment claimed 62.5 per cent of the turnover, and gross earnings on this type of goods were 19.9 per cent. For telecommunications and office machines, gross earnings in this industry class were the highest for sales of copying machines and equipment, with 31.3 per cent. Turnover of this product group came to NOK 948 million.

16.7 per cent for motor vehicles etc.

1998 sales in the main product group motor vehicles, agricultural and construction machinery and equipment amounted to NOK 47.3 billion, with gross earnings of 16.7 per cent. Of the turnover, wholesale of motor vehicles accounted for 53.2 per cent, i.e. NOK 25.1 billion. The largest was sales of private cars, station wagons, vans and light trucks in this industry subclass, with NOK 19.4 billion, and gross earnings of 10.6 per cent. Local kind-of-activity units in this industry subclass also sold NOK 2.2 billion worth of parts, with gross earnings of 28.5 per cent.

Wholesaling of parts and equipment for motor vehicles had 16.1 per cent of the turnover of the main product group, i.e. sales of the industry subclass for this type of product came to NOK 7.6 billion, with gross earnings of 30.3 per cent. Sales of parts were NOK 4 billion, with gross earnings of 34.3 per cent. Local kind-of-activity units in this industry subclass sold NOK 1.8 billion worth of tyres, with gross earnings of 24.5 per cent. In addition, they sold NOK 1.6 billion worth of equipment, with gross earnings of 27.2 per cent.

Wholesale of construction machinery and equipment had 12.5 per cent the turnover of the main product group, i.e. these local kind-of-activity units sold NOK 5.9 billion worth of this type of good, with gross earnings of 17.8 per cent. Sales of construction machinery and equipment accounted for NOK 4.8 billion, with gross earnings of 15.3 per cent. In addition, local kind-of-activity units sold NOK 1.1 billion worth of parts, with gross earnings of 28.9 per cent.

Wholesale of machinery and equipment for agriculture and forestry made up 10.3 per cent of the turnover of the main product group, i.e. their sales amounted for NOK 4.9 billion of this type of good. Gross earnings were 17.4 per cent. Sales of tractors and combine harvesters were the highest, at NOK 1.9 billion, and gross earnings of 12 per cent. In addition, NOK 905 million worth of forestry machinery and equipment were sold, with gross earnings of 16.1 per cent. In addition, local kind-of-activity units sold NOK 779 million worth of implements and NOK 655 million worth of parts. Gross earnings of these two product groups were 20.6 and 31.2 per cent respectively.

25.5 per cent for petroleum products

Norwegian wholesalers sold NOK 17.8 billion worth of petroleum products, with gross earnings of 25.5 per cent. Of this turnover, local kind-of-activity units engaged in the industry class wholesale of fuel had 95.7 per cent, and gross earrings of 25.1 per cent. Of the turnover of the industry class, sales of automotive petrol came to NOK 3.1 billion, with gross earnings of 35.9 per cent. Automotive diesel sales were NOK 2.8 billion, with gross earnings of 32.6 per cent. Lowest gross earnings were on marine gas oils, with 8.1 per cent. Of this product group, local kind-of-activity units engaged in wholesale of fuel sold NOK 2.6 billion in 1998. Local kind-of-activity units also sold NOK 1.3 billion worth of motor oil, lubricants, etc., with gross earnings of 38.2 per cent. These local kind-of-activity units also sold NOK 1.1 billion worth of domestic heating oil, with gross earnings of 30.6 per cent.

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