298848
/en/utdanning/statistikker/lvm/aar
298848
statistikk
2017-06-23T08:00:00.000Z
Education
en
lvm, Lifelong learning, adult education, training, Learning Conditions Monitor (LCM)Adult education, Education
true

Lifelong learning

Updated

Next update

Not yet determined

Key figures

47 %

of the employed participate in non-formal education

Participation in formal and non-formal education. Per cent
20172016
Participants in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)Participants in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)
Employed persons15471549
Not employed39163918

See more tables on this subject

Table 1 
Participants in formal and non-formal education among employed and not employed. Sex and age. Per cent

Participants in formal and non-formal education among employed and not employed. Sex and age. Per cent
2017
Employed personsNot employed
Participant in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)Participant in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)
Both sexes
15-66 years15473916
15-24 years59378620
25-34 years18473722
35-44 years9511417
45-54 years549313
55-61 years24517
62-66 years-43-5
Males
15-66 years12454216
15-24 years55448521
25-34 years15474122
35-44 years6481719
45-54 years345314
55-61 years140-7
62-66 years-45-4
Females
15-66 years17483615
15-24 years64298618
25-34 years21483422
35-44 years13551116
45-54 years753413
55-61 years24928
62-66 years-41-6

Table 2 
Participants in formal and non-formal education within different industries. Sex. Per cent

Participants in formal and non-formal education within different industries. Sex. Per cent
2017
Participants in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)
Both sexes
All industries1547
Agriculture, forestry and fishing1141
Mining etc., manufacture, power and water supply942
Construction1241
Wholesale and retail trade: repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles2037
Transportation and storage837
Accommodation and food service activities2922
Information and communication751
Financial and insurance activities952
Real estate, scientific, technical, administrative and support service activities1149
Public adm., defence, soc. security1266
Education2054
Human health and social work activities1653
Other service activities2544
Males
All industries1245
Agriculture, forestry and fishing742
Mining etc., manufacture, power and water supply841
Construction1241
Wholesale and retail trade: repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles1440
Transportation and storage537
Accommodation and food service activities2422
Information and communication749
Financial and insurance activities1252
Real estate, scientific, technical, administrative and support service activities1050
Public adm., defence, soc. security1265
Education2352
Human health and social work activities1955
Other service activities2740
Females
All industries1748
Agriculture, forestry and fishing2337
Mining etc., manufacture, power and water supply1144
Construction1438
Wholesale and retail trade: repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles2734
Transportation and storage1735
Accommodation and food service activities3323
Information and communication857
Financial and insurance activities551
Real estate, scientific, technical, administrative and support service activities1348
Public adm., defence, soc. security1168
Education1956
Human health and social work activities1552
Other service activities2446

Table 3 
Participants in formal and non-formal education among employed and not employed. Sex and level of education. Per cent

Participants in formal and non-formal education among employed and not employed. Sex and level of education. Per cent
2017
Employed personsNot employed
Participants in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)Participants in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)
1Includes intermediate level courses based on completed upper secondary level, but which are not accredited as tertiary education.
Both sexes
All levels15473916
Basic school level or no education completed22334515
Upper secondary education113413314
College and university level13582820
Males
All levels12454216
Basic school level or no education completed21344918
Upper secondary education110423113
College and university level11563820
Females
All levels17483615
Basic school level or no education completed25324112
Upper secondary education117403515
College and university level15592120

Table 4 
Participants in formal and non-formal education within different occupational groups.

Participants in formal and non-formal education within different occupational groups.
2017
Participants in formal education (per cent)Participants in non-formal education (per cent)
Both sexes
Managers657
Professionals1360
Technicians and associate professionals1052
Clerical support workers1336
Service and sales workers2737
Craft and related trades workers1336
Plant and machine operators and assemblers929
Males
Managers553
Professionals1057
Technicians and associate professionals1054
Clerical support workers1533
Service and sales workers2840
Craft and related trades workers1236
Plant and machine operators and assemblers930
Females
Managers863
Professionals1462
Technicians and associate professionals1150
Clerical support workers1138
Service and sales workers2736
Craft and related trades workers3434
Plant and machine operators and assemblers618

About the statistics

The Learning Conditions Monitor (LCM) is an annual ad hoc module to Statistics Norway’s Labour Force Survey (LFS) in the first quarter. The ad hoc survey focuses mainly on participation in education.

Definitions

Definitions of the main concepts and variables

Concepts and definitions in the LFS are in accordance with recommendations given by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and EU/Eurostat.

According to the international recommendations persons above a specified age should be classified by their attachment to the labour market in a specified, short period, either a day or a week. In the Norwegian LFS the reference period is one week, and the sample of persons are classified in relation to their situation in that reference week.

Employed persons are persons aged 15-74 who performed work for pay or profit for at least one hour in the reference week, or who were temporarily absent from work because of illness, holidays etc. Conscripts are classified as employed persons. Persons engaged by government measures to promote employment are also included if they receive wages.

Lifelong learning is here defined as all organised learning activity undertaken throughout life, and which results in improving knowledge, know-how, skills, competences and/or qualifications for personal, social and/or professional reasons.

Education refers to formal education as defined below.

Formal education includes all education leading to a qualification which is recognised in a (or the equivalent of a) national framework of qualification, e.g. elementary school, lower secondary school, modules or courses in upper secondary school, apprentices and practice candidates in upper secondary education, technical vocational schools, tertiary education giving official credit points and further education leading to a professional specialisation.

Non-formal education/training is any organised learning activity that is not formal education. It includes courses, seminars and conferences (where learning is the main purpose), public lectures and private lessons not part of formal education. The definition of non-formal education/training used in the Learning Conditions Monitor does not include guided on-the-job training.

Both formal education and non-formal education/training are institutionalised forms of learning. This entails that there is an organisation providing structured arrangements (which must include something similar to a student-teacher-relationship) especially designed for education and learning.

Training refers to non-formal education/training as defined here.

Informal learning is not institutionalised learning. It is thus less organised and less structured than formal education and non-formal education/training, often undertaken by the individual on his/her own. It may include watching TV or reading a book with the intention to learn, intentional learning from colleagues or family members, guided tours in a museum etc. The importance of the intention to learn when undertaking an activity separates informal learning from random learning.

For discussions and examples used to clarify between formal, non-formal and informal learning, see Eurostats Classification of Learning activities - Manual.

Providers of non-formal training are the institutions/organisations giving the lessons/instructions.

 

Standard classifications

The industrial classification of economic activities is in accordance with the Standard industrial Classification (SN2002) until 2007, and SN2007 from 2008 onwards. The standard is based on the EU standard if NACE rev. 1.1. Occupation is coded in accordance with the Standard classification of occupations, based on ISCO-08.

Educational attainment level is primarily based on information from register information in the National Education Database.

Administrative information

Name and topic

Name: Lifelong learning
Topic: Education

Responsible division

Division for Education Statistics

Regional level

Figures are presented at national level.

Frequency and timeliness

The Learning Conditions Monitor (LCM) is an annual ad hoc module to Statistic Norway’s Labour Force Survey (LFS) in the first quarter. The reference-period for this survey is the last 12 months prior to the interview.

International reporting

Not relevant

Microdata

The basic material (survey results from the interviewers) as well as the statistical files (on the basis of revision and estimation procedures) are stored. Anonymized microdata are sent to Norwegian Centre for Research Data (NSD).

Background

Background and purpose

The main purpose of the LFS is to provide data on employment and unemployment, and data on the labour force participation in different sections of the population. The Norwegian LFS started in 1972. For information about the history of the survey, and about breaks in the time-series, please cf. Labour Force Survey 2001 (NOS C748).

The Learning Conditions Monitor has provided valuable information on adult learning. The LCM is developed by the Fafo Institute for Labour and Social Research and financed by the Ministry of Education and Research. The LCM has been conducted as an annual ad hoc module to the LFS from 2003-2006, and from 2008. The sample size is about 20 000 respondents. The Norwegian AES has been adapted to assure the continuation of time series on some main indicators from the LCM such as learning demands and possibilities through the daily work, adult participation in formal education, further education and non-formal training and providers of job related non-formal training.  

Users and applications

By providing the relevant authorities and other users with information about the scope, form, content, and financing of adult learning, as well as the motivation and obstacles for education and training the LCM contributes to the knowledge base for policy development.

Key users in Norway include the Ministry of Education and Research as well as some other Ministries, trade unions, research institutions, international organisations etc.

Equal treatment of users

No external users have access to the statistics and analyses before they are published and accessible simultaneously for all users on ssb.no at 10 am. Prior to this, a minimum of three months' advance notice is given inthe Statistics Release Calendar. This is one of Statistics Norway’s key principles for ensuring that all users are treated equally.

Coherence with other statistics

This statistic is a part of the statistics of adult education and other tuition in Norway. For international comparisons, se the Adult Education Survey: www.ssb.no/vol_en

Legal authority

The Statistics Act §§ 2-1, 2-2 and 2-3.

EEA reference

LFS: Council Regulation (EC) nos 577/98, 1991/2002 and 2257/2003, and Commission Regulation nos 1575/2000, 1897/2000, 2104/2002, 430/2005 and 377/2008.

Production

Population

The total population aged 15-74 is covered by the LFS. Up to 2006 the group was 16-74, and age defined as completed years at the end of the year. As from 2006 age is defined as completed years at the time of the reference week. Observation unit: person.

Data sources and sampling

The main source for the LFS is quarterly, representative sample surveys based on interview by telephone. The questions in LCM is only asked in the first quarter.

Inhabitants in all municipalities are randomly selected, on the basis of a register of family units. The sample consists of about 12 000 family units (24 000 persons) each quarter. Each family member aged 15-74 participates in the survey, answering questions about their situation during a specified reference week. As from 1996 each family participates in the survey 8 times during a period of 8 quarters (before 1996: 4 times during 6 quarters). Up to 1996 a two stage sampling procedure was applied. For more information, please cf. Labour Force Survey 2001 (NOS C748). A sample of LFS respondents are asked to answer the questions in the LCM.

Collection of data, editing and estimations

Data collection: Interviews in the LFS are conducted by telephone. Information from previous interviews are used while asking about any changes in the situation, instead of the same, comprehensive data collection every time. For the coding of industry, information from some registers is also used. Demographic data are collected from the Central Population Register, and data on education are based on a register of individual data collected by Statistics Norway from the educational institutions (but questions are also asked to get more updated information). The respondent is usually the same person as the observation unit (but proxy interviews are done if it is not possible to get in contact with the observation unit; 14-15 per cent of the interviews are done by asking near family members). Proxy interviews are not used for the LCM. Data are collected weekly, i.e. the LFS is a continuous survey (all weeks are covered). Up to 1st quarter 1996 (from 2nd quarter 1988) the survey was based on one reference week each month, and in previous years on one week each quarter. Participation in the survey is compulsory, but compulsory fines are not used.

Editing: Editing includes both control and revision.Several automatic checks have been implemented in the electronic questionnaires to prevent erroneous/inconsistent answers, flagging warnings when such errors occur asking the respondent to provide a new and valid answer.

Estimation: Person is the unit for analysis. The accurate number of persons in the population being represented by one person in the sample, the inflation factor, varies, with 170 on an average for quarterly figures. The estimation is done by a poststratification method using information from the Central Population Register, the Register of Employees and the Tax Register.  

Seasonal adjustment

Seasonally adjusted data are calculated by using the X12ARIMA method. For more information see Seasonal adjustment of LFS.

Confidentiality

Not relevant

Comparability over time and space

It is possible to compare results on certain indicators in the AES with results on similar indicators in the Learning Conditions Monitors. Some additional questions have been added to the AES 2007 questionnaire to assure correspondence with filters and concepts used in these surveys.

From 2014, the age group 15-21 years are included.

Accuracy and reliability

Sources of error and uncertainty

In all surveys errors may occur in connection with both the collection and the processing of data.

The response rate in the LFS is about 85 per cent. Correction for total non-response is done in the estimating procedure. Partial non-response is adjusted for some variables.

The estimates from the LFS are based on a sample of family units. Somewhat different results might have been obtained if a different sample or if a complete census had been taken using the same questionnaires, interviewers, processing, etc. as those actually used in the LFS. The uncertainty introduced by sampling is called the sampling error or standard deviation of the estimates.

Revision

See principles for revisions in Statistics Norway.

Contact