299117
/en/transport-og-reiseliv/statistikker/skipute/aar
299117
statistikk
2017-06-07T08:00:00.000Z
Transport and tourism
en
skipute, Operating survey for vessels in water transport, gross freight, operating costs, time charters, bareboat freight, travel freight, liner freightSea transport , Transport and tourism
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Operating survey for vessels in water transport

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Key figures

21.9

billion NOK in operating profit in 2015

Enterprises in ocean transport. Turnover and costs (NOK million)
2015Per cent change
2014 - 2015
Turnover
Freight goods67 647.6-7.0
Pax freights5 114.95.3
Timecharter47 606.14.1
Bareboat freights11 676.919.6
Commision including administrative pool earnings15 482.434.2
 
Costs
Voyage dependent costs and bunker32 074.5-11.7
Timecharter paid17 965.3-6.5
Bareboat freights paid8 141.6133.2
Other costs70 009.86.5
 
Operating profit21 908.310.3

See more tables on this subject

Table 1 
Enterprises in ocean transport. Turnover and costs (NOK million)

Enterprises in ocean transport. Turnover and costs (NOK million)
201520142013
1All management included from 2009.
2Exclusive bunker costs.
3Inclusive laid-up costs.
4New data in 2009.
5Exclusive depreciation and writedown costs.
Turnover
Voyage freights31 070.843 926.040 430.7
Contract of Affreightment18 118.312 539.212 635.5
Liner freights18 458.516 270.112 895.5
Pax freights5 114.94 855.34 628.4
Timecharter from Norwegian charterers15 245.612 270.311 585.1
Timecharter from offshore supply vessels4 374.33 329.98 159.6
Timecharter from foreign charterers27 986.230 146.024 136.2
Bareboat freights from Norwegian charterers4 095.84 360.22 226.9
Bareboat freights from foreign charterers7 581.15 400.75 948.5
Commission including administrative pool earnings115 482.411 535.39 117.8
Other freight contracts2 571.3--
Total gross freights150 099.2144 633.2131 764.2
 
Costs
Commission to charterers, brokers and agents2 782.72 310.92 184.9
Voyage dependent costs218 283.617 594.414 998.0
Bunker13 790.918 734.217 824.8
Lubricate oil581.5484.6528.6
Loading and unloading4 739.55 246.73 472.0
Timecharter paid for hire of Norwegian vessels2 561.94 940.15 098.5
Timecharter paid for hire of foreign vessels15 403.414 276.411 471.5
Bareboat freights paid for hire of Norwegian vessels6 205.43 096.73 696.5
Bareboat freights paid for hire of foreign vessels1 936.2395.31 587.3
Gross wage and social benefits to crew members19 180.918 426.018 069.8
Insurance premium on vessels1 497.31 322.71 340.1
Costs for repairing and maintenance of vessels34 116.15 098.84 884.6
Docking costs3 547.71 934.21 718.3
Gross wage to landbased staff43 799.15 716.64 895.3
Adm. costs for operation of vessels5 109.76 635.05 753.1
Other operating costs24 655.318 560.316 735.1
Total operating costs5128 190.9124 772.9114 258.5
 
Operating profit21 908.319 860.317 505.7
Operating profit in per cent14.613.713.3

Table 2 
Ocean transport, freight income by type of ship (NOK 1 000)

Ocean transport, freight income by type of ship (NOK 1 000)
Freight income
201520142013
1Ocean transport includes enterprises in industry subclasses 50.101 Passenger ocean transport, 50.201 Freight ocean transport, 50.203 Tugboats and 50.204 Supply and other sea transport offshore services
2Freights from tug and salvage vessels (6) are registered under offshore vessels
3In 2009 freights from seismographic research vessels were registered as freights from other (9). This should have been registered as freights from offshore vessels (5)
 
All types of vessel1120 273 202127 539 741118 538 324
 
Tanker30 414 83926 636 12931 086 598
Bulk vessel14 180 32524 370 64918 396 039
General cargo/other dry cargo vessel36 610 52632 543 49229 539 307
Passenger vessels5 527 0175 495 5115 324 952
Offshore vessels30 409 17832 957 10431 250 469
Tug and salvage vessels2000
Fishing and hunting vessels000
Specialized vessels and support vessels000
Other33 131 3175 536 8562 940 959

Table 3 
Enterprises in coastal water transport. Turnover specified by type of service (NOK 1 000)

Enterprises in coastal water transport. Turnover specified by type of service (NOK 1 000)
201520142013
Total12 842 08011 935 89910 780 994
Passenger transport - domestic sea transport3 824 3272 451 4523 246 726
Passenger transport - foreign sea transport215 348197 433175 742
Freight transport (freight above 25 kg) - domestic sea transport3 863 8543 327 7902 534 011
Freight transport (freight under 25 kg) - domestic sea transport10 0991 4422 910
Freight transport - foreign sea transport176 763265 891260 875
Car ferry service2 416 8742 403 8012 253 429
Offshore supply service - domestic sea transport44 52202 360
Offshore supply service - foreign sea transport000
Renting of vessels with crew584 586605 067727 539
Renting of vessels without crew22 53439 58814 566
Tug service120 366030 215
Other1 562 8072 643 4351 532 621

About the statistics

The operating survey of vessels in water transport presents turnover and costs specified by type of service, and freight income by vessel type. Analysis is restricted to enterprises operating in water transport.

Definitions

Definitions of the main concepts and variables

Voyage Charters (parties)

Contracts of carriage, in which the charterer pays for the use of a ship's cargo space for one, or sometimes more than one, voyage. Under this type of charter, the shipowner pays all the operating cost of the ship while payment for port and cargo handling charges are the subject of agreement between the parties. Freight is generally paid per unit of cargo, such as tonne, based on an agreed quantity, or as a lump sum irrespective of the quantity loaded. The terms and conditions of the contract are set down in a document known as a voyage charterparty. If it is a consecutive voyage charter party, the document specify the number of voyages, time, amount and weight of the goods to be transported, as the freight rate. Another kind of contract called "Contract of Affreightment" (COA or C.O.A.) is sentered on the volume of goods. Charterparties and bills of lading are contracts of affreightment. All herein includes eqivalent income from agency/pool.

Liner freights, transport of goods

Earned gross freight in the form of liner freights for transportation of goods. This also includes income form pool agreement for liner services. Service provided by a shipping company whereby cargo-carrying ships are operated between scheduled advertised ports of loading and discharge on a regular basis is said to be liner freight or liner service. The freight rates which are charged are based on the shipping company's tariff or, if the company is a member of a liner conference, the tariff of that conference.

Liner freights transport of passengers.

Earned gross freight in form of liner freights for transport of passengers, including income from sale of goods. A liner freight for transport of passengers is a passenger's ship which is operated between scheduled, advertised ports of calling on a regular basis.

Bareboat charter income from Norwegian charterers.

Income from renting out the ship in the form of a bareboat charter party to Norwegian charterers. A bareboat charter or demise charter is when the charterers hire or charter the ship for a long period, appoint the master and crew, and pay all running expenses. In other words, the charterer takes over both, the management and commercial operation of the ship. The hire is calculated at so much per ton dead weight per calendar month. The charter hire may also be on a Lump Sum, q.v., daily basis.

Bareboat charter Income from foreign charterers

Income from renting out the ship in the form of a bareboat charter party to foreign charterers. A bareboat charter or demise charter is when the charterers hire or charter the ship for a long period, appoint the master and crew, and pay all running expenses. In other words, the charterer takes over both, the management and commercial operation of the ship. The hire is calculated at so much per ton dead weight per calendar month. The charter hire may also be on a Lump Sum, q.v., daily basis.

Time charter income from Norwegian time charterers

Income from renting out the ship in the form of a time charterparty to Norwegian time charterers. Under this type of contract, the shipowner places his ship, with crew and equipment at the disposal of the charterer for a period of time, q.v., for which the time charterer pays hire money. Subject to any restrictions in the contract, the charterer decides the time and quantity of cargo to be carried and the ports of loading and discharging. He is responsible for supplying the ship with bunkers and for the payment of cargo handling operations, port charges, pilotage, towage and ship's agency. The technical operation and navigation of the ship remains the responsability of the shipowner. Any amount of time where the ship si "off hire" is deducted from the agreed period of hire contract. Includes eqivalent income from agency/pool.

Time charter income from Offshore supply vessels

Income from renting out the ship in the form of a time charterparty as an offshore supply vessel. Under this type of contract, the shipowner places his ship, with crew and equipment at the disposal of the charterer for a period of time, q.v., for which the time charterer pays hire money. Subject to any restrictions in the contract, the charterer decides the time and quantity of cargo to be carried and the ports of loading and discharging. He is responsible for supplying the ship with bunkers and for the payment of cargo handling operations, port charges, pilotage, towage and ship's agency. The technical operation and navigation of the ship remain the responsability of the shipowner. Time of "off hire" is deducted from the agreed period of hire contract. Includes eqivalent income from agency/pool.

Time charter income from foreign charterers

Income from renting out the ship in the form of a time charterparty to foreign time charterers. Under this type of contract, the shipowner places his ship, with crew and equipment at the disposal of the charterer for a period of time, q.v., for which the time charterer pays hire money. Subject to any restrictions in the contract, the charterer decides the time and quantity of cargo to be carried and the ports of loading and discharging. He is responsible for supplying the ship with bunkers and for the payment of cargo handling operations, port charges, pilotage, towage and ship's agency. The technical operation and navigation of the ship remain the responsability of the shipowner. Time of "off hire" is deducted from the agreed period of hire contract. Includes eqivalent income from agency/pool.

Enterprise In the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) an enterprise is the smallest combination of legal entities that is an organizational unit producing goods or services, which benefits from a certain degree of autonomy in decision making.

Local kind-of-activity unit (local KAU) The SIC defines a local KAU as a functional unit, which at a single physical location is engaged primarily in activities within a specific activity group.

Location Location is according to municipal borders at 1 January 2002. In some industry divisions an enterprise can conduct business in several municipalities and counties without being divided into several KAUs. In such cases, the combined operations of the enterprise are registered at the office address of the enterprise.

Standard classifications

The Standard Industrial Classification (SN2007) used in Statistics Norway is based on the EU Standard NACE Rev. 1.

Administrative information

Name and topic

Name: Operating survey for vessels in water transport
Topic: Transport and tourism

Responsible division

Transport, tourism and ICT statistics

Regional level

National level

Frequency and timeliness

Annual

International reporting

Not relevant

Microdata

Primary data and information on sample units and population are stored permanently as text-files.

Background

Background and purpose

The purpose of this survey is to show Norwegian shipping companies activity in foreign going trade. All vessels operated from Norway are included in the survey.

Users and applications

Users include public and private sector agencies, private organizations, individuals and organizations such as the National Accounts and other divisions of Statistics Norway. In addition to the tables included in this publication, a number of other or more detailed tables can be commissioned from Statistics Norway.

Equal treatment of users

No external users have access to the statistics and analyses before they are published and accessible simultaneously for all users on ssb.no at 8 am. Prior to this, a minimum of three months' advance notice is given inthe Statistics Release Calendar.

Coherence with other statistics

This survey is not new, until 2000 it was named "gross freight earnings and operating expenses for vessels in foreign-going trade". The survey was mainly based on collection of questionnaire forms where observation unit was the vessel. There was however low coverage of vessels in foreign ship registers.

Legal authority

Statistics Act Sections 2-2 and 2-3

EEA reference

Not relevant

Production

Population

The structural statistics for water transport are organized according to the NACE-standard (SN2007) and include the following industry divisions:

  • 50.1 Sea and coastal passenger water transport
  • 50.2 Sea and coastal freight water transport
  • 50.3 Inland passenger water transport

 The operating survey for vessels in foreign going trade comprise most of the enterprises and local KAUs that is registered in the abovementioned industry divisions, as long as the enterprise or local KAU was registered with activity in Norway in the relevant statistical year.

The exception is enterprises and local KAUs within the public service sectors 110, 510 and 550. Such units are not included in the structural business statistics for transport and tourism even though they should happen to have operations in the abovementioned industry.

However, all other enterprises and local KAUs in the public sector or owned by the public sector, i.e. units with sector codes 610, 630, 635, 660 and 680, are included in the statistics if they have activity in the abovementioned industry.

Data sources and sampling

For a sample of the enterprises in the population, the statistics are based on Trading Statements (NO) and a supplementary questionnaire. The Trading Statements are either attached to the questionnaires or submitted electronically via the Norwegian Internal Revenue Service. Enterprises with more than one local KAU outside the sample are asked to report turnover and number of employees through the structural survey of Statistics Norway.

Information, like the accounts, turnover and number of employees, about the enterprises with only one local KAU outside the sample is obtained from the Register of Annual Company Reports in Brønnøysund, the VAT Register and/or the Register of Employees and Employers (the AA Register). The remaining enterprises with only one local KAU are asked to report turnover through the structural survey of Statistics Norway.

The Central Register of Establishments and Enterprises is used to obtain necessary information about the population. The VAT Register, the Central Coordinating Register for Legal Entities, information from trade organizations and direct input from the enterprises are used to update the Central Register of Establishments and Enterprises.

The population consists of all enterprises in the relevant industry divisions with registered activity in the reference year. The population is divided into subpopulations, called strata, after criteria like industrial classification and number of employees. In some of the strata, all enterprises are always included in the sample. From the remaining strata, a representative selection of enterprises is drawn. All enterprises in this sample are asked to report a full set of Trading Statements and to complete a questionnaire.

This detailed survey of accounting data is combined with the additional information from the various registers and the structural survey of Statistics Norway to form the basis for the estimation of the financial structures of the different industries and the transport and tourism sector as a whole.

Collection of data, editing and estimations

The questionnaires are sent out within three months after the end of the statistical year, with a response deadline of three or four weeks. The enterprises that do not respond on the first letter will be given reminders in writing for about a further six months from the first deadline.

Editing and corrections are carried out on the information obtained from the sample population and the structural survey. The raw data are checked against reports for last year, the Central Register of Establishments and Enterprises, the Register of Annual Company Reports in Brønnøysund and other available sources, and by contacting the respondent if necessary.

Seasonal adjustment

Not relevant

Confidentiality

To enable an estimation of the total set of data (Trading Statements and questionnaire) for all enterprises that are not included in the sample, the collected material has to be representative for the entire population.

The likelihood of being in the sample increases with the size of enterprise turnover in the previous year. The contribution ratio (i.e. the ratio of turnover in the sample in relation to turnover in the population) is checked after the first selection round. Sampling rates are thereafter adjusted in industries with low contribution ratios.

Comparability over time and space

Including the year 2001 The Standard Industrial Classification 1994 (SIC94) was used, as from 2002 The Standard Industrial Classification 2002(SIC2002) is used. This means that not all industries are comparable backwards on 4- and 5-digit level, this is marked with explanatory notes and/or breakes in the tables affected. The change of classification has no influence on 2- and 3-digit level.

For some industrial subclasses there has been a significant increase in the number of enterprises and local KAUs between 2001 and 2002. This is, to a large extent, due to better register information as a result of the value added tax (VAT) reform and enterprises and local KAUs with low turnover - that were previously not included - are included from 2002.

Updating of industries in the Central Register of Establishments and Enterprises may also have caused revisions for some of the industries. These changes have not been dated back.

From 2009 personnell costs includes costs of crew hired through crewing companies. Prior to 2009 personnell coststs where limited to crew in permanent employment contracts.

Accuracy and reliability

Sources of error and uncertainty

Returned questionnaires are read optically and automatically checked. An optical image of the form is first saved electronically and then checked manually in order to ensure that the primary data are as correct as possible. Nevertheless, the results of a statistical survey may contain some collection and processing errors.

Collection errors occur when the provider of the data gives incorrect answers due to forgetfulness, misunderstanding of questions etc. Processing errors are errors from coding or errors that occur during the transferring of information from the questionnaire to a machine-readable medium or during editing.

Sampling errors are errors that may arise in areas subject to sampling.

Variance For other variables than turnover and employment the statistics are based on estimated figures from sample-based surveys and not on figures from full censuses. When basing the statistics on sample-based surveying instead of a full census, there may be a certain statistical deviation between the properties of the sample population and the population. This imbalance in the sample will normally be reduced by increasing the size of the sample, and will therefore be closely connected to sampling rates percentages and contribution ratios for various key variables.

There are no fixed rules on acceptable sampling rates or contribution ratios. In a homogeneous population, that is a population where the units are similar to one another, a relatively low sampling rate or contribution ratio may give satisfactory results. On the other hand, in heterogeneous populations the sampling rate and contribution ratios should be higher.

Groups that are based on relatively few observations will easily be affected by observations that deviate from the group average. To identify and to help deciding what to do with such extreme observations in the production of the statistics, there has been developed a special programme.

Bias: Sample bias may arise when the distribution on some variables in different parts of the sample is not the same as the corresponding distribution in the population. Stratification is used in the structural business statistics to reduce the possibility of imbalance in the sample. When stratifying the population, it is divided into several unique subpopulations after criteria like industrial classification, turnover and number of employees. This is done to ensure that each subpopulation consists of units that are as homogenous as possible. The sample is then drawn from all of the subpopulations.

Non-responses that are not randomly distributes can still make the sample biased. Post-stratification adjusts any imbalances arising in the distribution between the stratification variables due to non-response.

Non-response: Non-response, that is when the respondent does not return the form or returns the form with incomplete information, will always be an aspect of form-based surveys. In the structural business statistics, non-respondent enterprises are treated the same way as enterprises outside the sample population.

In the structural business statistics, the Central Register of Establishments and Enterprises, the Register of Annual Company Reports in Brønnøysund, the VAT Register and the Register of Employees and Employers (the AA Register) are used in order to define the population and help collect the necessary data.

Errors in these administrative registers - like time gaps in registration, incorrectly identified unit characteristics etc. may therefore be a potential source of uncertainty in the statistics and may for instance have an impact when dividing the population into adequate strata.

Revision

Not relevant

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