189362
189362
nokkeltallsside
2016-03-03T10:00:00.000Z
Immigration and immigrants
en
Immigration and immigrants

Key figure page

Key figures for immigration and immigrants

Do you wonder how many immigrants are living in Norway, what are the most common reasons for immigration or how many immigrants have jobs? Here is a selection of key figures, statistics and analyses on immigration and immigrants in Norway.

Statistics Norway publishes statistics on regal residents. We do not publish statistics on asylum seekers, i.e. those who have applied for protection (asylum) in Norway and whose application has not yet been finalized. Please consult The Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) for statistics and information about asylum seekers.

 

Number of immigrants and norwegian born with imigrant parents, by country of origin. 1 January1
Number Five years earlier Ten years earlier Period
1Due to rounding of the numbers at an aggregate level, the sums may deviate from the actual numbers in the Statbank
Persons with immigrant background, total 804 964 552 313 364 981 2015
EU28/EEA, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand 355 130 213 969 120 043 2015
Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania excl. Australia and New Zealand, and Europe outside EU/EEA 449 834 338 344 244 938 2015
Immigrants, total 669 378 459 346 301 045 2015
EU28/EEA, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand 327 054 200 648 111 805 2015
Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania excl. Australia and New Zealand, and Europe outside EU/EEA 342 324 258 698 189 240 2015
Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, total 135 583 92 967 63 936 2015
EU28/EEA, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand 28 073 13 321 8 238 2015
Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania excl. Australia and New Zealand, and Europe outside EU/EEA 107 510 79 646 55 698 2015
Immigration, emigration and net-migration, by world region12
Number Five years earlier Ten years earlier Period
1Due to rounding of the numbers at an aggregate level, the sums may deviate from the actual numbers in the Statbank
2Includes Norwegian and foreign citizens
Immigration 67 275 73 852 40 149 2015
EU/EEA, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand 40 502 53 779 24 367 2015
Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania excl. Australia and New Zealand, and Europe outside EU/EEA 25 956 19 414 15 591 2015
Stateless 780 633 171 2015
Unspecified 37 26 20 2015
Emigration 37 474 31 506 21 707 2015
EU/EEA, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand 29 503 25 792 17 754 2015
Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania excl. Australia and New Zealand, and Europe outside EU/EEA 7 924 5 676 3 926 2015
Stateless 39 35 27 2015
Unspecified 8 3 0 2015
Net migration 29 801 42 346 18 442 2015
EU/EEA, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand 10 999 27 987 6 613 2015
Asia, Africa, Latin America, Oceania excl. Australia and New Zealand, and Europe outside EU/EEA 18 032 13 738 11 665 2015
Stateless 741 598 144 2015
Unspecified 29 23 20 2015
Students in tertiary education in per cent of registered age group 19-24 years, by country of origin and sex
Share Change in % previous year Year
Both sexes
Total population 34.9 2.6 2015
Immigrants, total 18.4 9.5 2015
Norwegian-born to immigrant parents 43.1 3.9 2015
Women
Total population 42.3 2.4 2015
Immigrants, total 22.4 10.3 2015
Norwegian-born to immigrant parents 49.7 4.0 2015
Men
Total population 27.9 3.0 2015
Immigrants, total 14.8 9.6 2015
Norwegian-born to immigrant parents 37.0 4.2 2015
  • Persons with an immigrant background
    As of 1 January 2017, around 884 000 persons resident in Norway were either immigrants (725 000) or born in Norway to two immigrant parents (159 000). These groups combined make up 16 per cent of the population of Norway.
  • From many different countries
    The population of Norway includes persons with backgrounds from 221 different countries and autonomous regions. The largest groups of immigrants are from Poland, Lithuania and Somalia.
  • In all municipalities
    There are immigrants in all Norwegian municipalities, most in Oslo, Båtsfjord and Drammen, where immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents make up 33, 29 and 28 per cent of the population respectively in 2017.
  • Many young immigrants
    Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents are, on average, much younger than the population in general. The immigrant group is made up of a large number of young adults. Half of all immigrants in Norway are aged between 20 and 40. Only 9 per cent are over the age of 60. Children born to immigrants in Norway are even younger. Slightly more than half are below the age of 10, 80 per cent are under 20 and just 1.7 per cent are over 40 years of age.
  • Period of residence
    There are major disparities in how long immigrants have lived in Norway. Some groups, including those from Pakistan, Vietnam, Turkey and Morocco, have lived in Norway for a long time, while immigrants from the new EU countries – particularly Poland and Lithuania – have lived here for a shorter period of time; mostly less than five years. Refugees from Syria, Somalia and Afghanistan have also lived in Norway for a relatively short period of time.
  • Various reasons for immigrating
    Immigrants move to Norway due to work, family, as refugees or to study. Since 2007, work has been the most common reason for immigration , followed by family immigration.
  • Participation in the labour market
    A total of 63.4 per cent of immigrants aged 15-74 years were in employment in 2015, compared to 68.5 per cent of the population as a whole. Among immigrants, the share of men in employment is far higher than for women. The gender gap is twice as large among immigrants compered to the population as a whole. There are also major disparities in employment between the different country groups. 69 per cent of the immigrants from the EU etc. were in employment in 2015, while the share among immigrants from Asia was 56 per cent and from Africa 42 per cent.
  • Many take tertiary education
    In 2015, 43 per cent of the 19-24 year-olds born in Norway to two immigrant parents were university or college students . The corresponding figure for immigrants was 18 per cent, and for all 19-24 year-olds as a whole the figure was 35 per cent. The relatively low share among immigrants is largely due to the fact that many immigrants in this age group come to Norway to work – not to study.
  • Statistics since 1865
    Statistics Norway has published figures on “foreign-born persons” ever since the census of 1865. At that time, 1.2 per cent of the population were born abroad; mostly in Sweden. By 1920, the share had risen to 2.8 per cent, but sank again during World War II, and in 1950 was 1.4 per cent. After the war, Norway received refugees from Eastern Europe, followed by labour immigrants from other parts of the world. After the freeze on labour immigration in 1975, it was mostly refugees from Asia, Africa, South America and Eastern Europe that came to Norway. The expansion of the EU in 2004 led to a marked increase in immigration from new EU countries, particularly from Poland and Lithuania.
  • Religion and ethnicity
    No register is kept of persons broken down by religion, beliefs or ethnicity. Details are available, however, on the number of members of religious and philosophical communities that receive government funding.

Figure 1. Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents, by country of origin from 1 January 2014

Figure 2. In-, out-, and net-migration, foreign citizens

Figure 3. Non-Nordic immigrants, by reason for immigration

Figure 4. Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents 1 January 2006 and 2014

Figure 5. Share of foreign-born persons resident in Europe. 2013