283320
/en/helse/statistikker/royk/aar
283320
Fewer people smoke, but more women use snuff
statistikk
2017-01-18T08:00:00.000Z
Health
en
royk, Smoking habits, smokers, daily smokers, tobacco use, snuff usersHealth conditions and living habits, Health
true
There are fewer people smoking daily today compared to 10 years ago, but the use of snuff has increased in recent years – particularly among younger women. One out of six women aged 16-34 years used snuff daily in 2016, and use among young women is almost as extensive as among men of the same age.

Smoking habits

Updated

Next update

Key figures

12 %

daily smokers in Norway in 2016

Smokers and snuffers
2006201120152016
Figures were corrected 20 January 2017
Both sexes
Percentage daily smokers24171312
Percentage occasional smokers101199
Takes snuff daily - per cent.81010
Takes snuff occasionally - per cent.544
Males
Percentage daily smokers23171313
Percentage occasional smokers11111010
Takes snuff daily - per cent.131513
Takes snuff occasionally - per cent.765
Females
Percentage daily smokers24181311
Percentage occasional smokers101087
Takes snuff daily - per cent.347
Takes snuff occasionally - per cent.324

About the statistics

Statistics on the population's use of tobacco; smoking and use of snuff, distributed by age, sex and educational level. Data on smoking have been collected since 1973 and use of snuff since 2008.

Definitions

Definitions of the main concepts and variables

The share of smokers is measured by two questions: "Do you sometimes smoke?" and "Do you smoke daily or occasionally?".

The share of snuff users is measured by one question: ´´Do you use snuff daily, occasionally, or never? ´´.

Standard classifications

Not relevant

Administrative information

Name and topic

Name: Smoking habits
Topic: Health

Next release

Responsible division

Division for Health Statistics

Regional level

County

Frequency and timeliness

Data is collected quarterly and published annually at the beginning of each year.

International reporting

Statistics Norway reports annual figures to the OECD and NOMESKO.

Microdata

The final data are anonymized and sent to NSD - Norwegian Centre for Research Data.

Background

Background and purpose

The purpose of the survey is to obtain information about smoking habits in Norway. Statistics Norway has collected data on smoking habits since 1973 and on snuffing habits since 2008. The data is now collected on commission from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

Users and applications

The statistics are primarily used by the Directorate for Health as well as research institutions, the public and media.

Equal treatment of users

No external users have access to the statistics and analyses before they are published and accessible simultaneously for all users on ssb.no at 8 am. Prior to this, a minimum of three months' advance notice is given inthe Statistics Release Calendar.

Coherence with other statistics

Not relevant

Legal authority

The Statistics Act §2-1 (voluntary)

EEA reference

Not relevant

Production

Population

The statistics cover a representative sample of persons living in Norway aged 16&–74 years.

Data sources and sampling

The questions about smoking habits are asked as a part of the quarterly Holiday and Travel Survey. The Statistics Norway’s population database is used to define the populations and draw the samples. In addition, information about the level of education is linked from register.

The survey is based on a representative sample of 2000 persons in the age of 16-74 years each quarter, in total 8000 persons per year. In the course of a year, four surveys with a total net sample of almost 4 500 are carried out. The results are published for the year as a whole.

Statistics Norway has conducted surveys on smoking habits since 1973. Since 2008, the survey also includes questions about Norwegians’ use of snuff on a quarterly basis.

Collection of data, editing and estimations

The data collection is primarily done by telephone interviews as a part of the Holiday and Travel Survey.

 

The data is collected by computer-assisted interviews. There are several procedures for electronically controlling the registration of answer in the questionnaire. In some cases the interviewer gets a &“warning´´ when recording an answer, in other cases only values within certain pre-specified limits are accepted. In addition, there are checks that ensure that only valid codes for the answer categories are accepted.

Seasonal adjustment

Not relevant

Confidentiality

Not relevant

Comparability over time and space

Statistics Norway has collected data on smoking habits in Norway since 1973, and on habits of snuff use since 2008.

From 2014, Statistics Norway has decided to estimate weights to adjust for possible biases introduced by non-response. Using weights will affect the numbers somewhat, but the trend we have seen over many years will remain unchanged, even with weighted figures. The tabel shows weighted and unweighted numbers for 2012 and 2013.

 

 

2012

2013

 

unweighted

weighted

unweighted

weighted

Total

15,6

16,2

14,6

15,6

Gender

 

 

 

 

Men

15,7

16,2

15,1

16,3

Women

15,5

16,1

14,1

14,8

Age

 

 

 

 

16-24 years

6,9

6,8

7,1

7,0

25-44 years

14,5

15,7

13,5

15,1

45-66 years

20,3

21,4

19,1

20,6

67 years and older

13,4

13,6

12,2

13,0

From 1973 to 2008, three-year moving averages were estimated. A moving average is calculated as the average of results from three consecutive years, and this represents the middle of the three years. From 2009, Statistics Norway has decided to use the actual figures for each year.

 

Accuracy and reliability

Sources of error and uncertainty

Measurement errors are errors that occur during data collection and are caused by the survey instrument: the form, questionnaire or measuring device used for data collection may lead to the recording of wrong values. The respondent may also consciously or unconsciously, give erroneous data or interviewers may influence the answers given by respondents.

Processing errors are errors introduced during data processing in Statistics Norway, such as coding, data entry, data editing, imputation etc. Efforts have been made to minimise both measurement and processing errors by developing a control system in the questionnaire.

Non response errors are errors by unit non-response, i.e. that the individual has failed to respond, or item non response, i.e. that the respondent has failed to respond to some but not all the questions in the survey.

The unit non-response in this survey is between 35 and 45 per cent. For more information on biases caused by non-response, please see the publications for each Holiday and Travel survey.

Sampling errors arise from the fact that the estimates are based on a sample and not a census of the entire population. The sampling error is measured by the standard error which estimates the expected deviation between the survey estimate and the estimate that would have been obtained if a complete enumeration had been carried out.

The exact standard error is not calculated for this survey. However, by using the figure below one can find the expected standard error. The number of observations in this survey is about 4500-5000.

Figure 1. Expected standard error for observed percentages by different sample sizes

Number of observations

5/95

10/90

15/85

20/80

25/75

30/70

35/65

40/60

50/50

25

4,4

6,0

7,1

8,0

8,7

9,2

9,5

9,8

10,0

50

3,1

4,2

5,0

5,7

6,1

6,5

6,7

6,9

7,1

100

2,2

3,0

3,6

4,0

4,3

4,6

4,8

4,9

5,0

500

1,0

1,3

1,6

1,8

1,9

2,0

2,1

2,2

2,2

1000

0,7

0,9

1,1

1,3

1,4

1,4

1,5

1,5

1,6

1500

0,6

0,8

0,9

1,0

1,1

1,2

1,2

1,3

1,3

2000

0,5

0,7

0,8

0,9

1,0

1,0

1,1

1,1

1,1

3000

0,4

0,5

0,7

0,7

0,8

0,8

0,9

0,9

0,9

4000

0,3

0,5

0,6

0,6

0,7

0,7

0,8

0,8

0,8

5000

0,3

0,4

0,5

0,6

0,6

0,6

0,7

0,7

0,7

Revision

Not relevant

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