10322
/en/helse/statistikker/dodsarsak/aar
10322
Cancer main cause of reduced life expectancy
statistikk
2008-06-27T10:00:00.000Z
Health;Population
en
dodsarsak, Causes of death (discontinued), causes of death (for example cancer, cardiovascular diseases, accidents), deaths, place of death, fatal accidents, suicide, cot deaths, infant mortalityBirths and deaths, Causes of death, Population, Health
false

Causes of death (discontinued)2006

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health has the role of data processor for the Cause of Death Registry as from 1 January 2014, and is the publisher of causes of death statistics from the statistical year 2013. Applications for access to data held in the Cause of Death Registry should be sent to datatilgang@fhi.no.

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Cancer main cause of reduced life expectancy

There were 41 242 deaths registered in Norway in 2006, comprising 21 621 women and 19 621 men. Cardiovascular diseases and cancer were the cause of 60 per cent of all deaths.

Mortality due to COPD and lung cancer by sex and age, 1996-2006

Mortality due to COPD and lung cancer by sex, 1996-2006

Mortality due to cardiovascular diseases is still decreasing and 70 per cent of these deaths were among people 80 years or older. Cancer as the cause of death shows only a moderate decrease. More than 60 per cent of cancer deaths were among people younger than 80 years of age, meaning cancer is the main cause of reduced life expectancies for both sexes.

In 2006 there were 3 767 deaths due to lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, ICD-10 codes J40-J44), an increase of 22 per cent from 1996. Lung cancer was the cause of death for 792 women and 1 209 men, while 838 deaths among women and 928 deaths among men were due to COPD. About 40 per cent of all deaths due to lung cancer were among people younger than 70 years of age. In comparison, only 17 per cent of all deaths due to COPD occurred in the same age group.

Death due to ischemic heart diseases (standardised death rate by gender and age per 100 000 persons)

Death due to ischemic heart diseases by sex (standardised death rate per 100 000 persons)

Decrease in mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases

Mortality due to ischemic heart diseases, including heart infarction, angina pectoris and atherosclerotic heart disease, continued to decline in 2006, and was down by nearly 35 per cent from 1996.

Most causes of death vary significantly with people’s age and sex. The use of the standard death rate (per 100 000) improves comparability over time within a country and between countries. Using this standardised death rate confirms the decrease in deaths caused by ischemic heart diseases in Norway. The decline in mortality is greater for men than for women. The decrease in deaths caused by these diseases is higher in Norway than in Sweden and Finland. However the level of mortality due to ischemic heart diseases in Norway is still higher than for countries like Spain, Portugal and especially France.

Heart problems main cause of death among those over 80

The central concept for classifying causes of deaths is the “underlying cause of death” which means that each death has only one underlying cause. The statistics is based on this single diagnosis. More than 50 per cent of all deaths were among people 80 years or older. Death due to cancer was the main reason for deaths in the age group 0-79 years, while death due to cardiovascular diseases make up about 70 per cent of the group 80 years or older.

Deaths by age and underlying cause of death in 2006.

Data sources

Among other factors, data quality relies on correct diagnosis, for instance whether there has been carried out an autopsy or not, how changes in classification are dealt with and which method is chosen to process the data. The main source of error is the reliability of the diagnosis filled in the death certificate by the physicians. However, for many deaths among the elderly there is no obvious underlying cause. An ageing population with a very complex clinical picture complicates the identification of the underlying cause of death. This is a problem for the certifier as well for the statistics agency which produces the statistics according to ICD-10’s guidelines for recording and coding. This does not contribute to the clarity of the underlying cause of an ageing population.

Statistics Norway's Division for Health Statistics is the data processor for the Cause of Death Registry, which is owned by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (FHI). For more information on causes of death, go to the FHI's website.

 

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