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/en/befolkning/statistikker/fobinnvbolig/hvert-10-aar
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Non-western immigrants live in cramped conditions
statistikk
2002-11-12T10:00:00.000Z
Population;Immigration and immigrants;Construction, housing and property
en
fobinnvbolig, Population and housing census. Housing conditions of immigrants (discontinued), building types (for example detached house, terrace housing, block), year of construction, tenure status, dwelling size, dwelling standard, country backgroundDwelling and housing conditions , Construction, housing and property, Population and housing censuses , Immigration and immigrants, Population, Construction, housing and property
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Population and housing census. Housing conditions of immigrants (discontinued)2001

The statistics has been discontinued.

Content

Published:

Non-western immigrants live in cramped conditions

There are great differences in living conditions of persons of non-immigrant background and persons of non-western background. Most people of non-immigrant background live in detached houses that they own themselves. Few people in this category live in cramped conditions and the majority has access to their own garden and balcony. Persons from non-western countries live in blocks of flats, most of them renting rather than owning, they live in cramped dwellings and fewer have access to a garden or balcony.

This is illustrated by figures from the 2001 Population and housing census.

There are clear differences among the immigrant groups. Western immigrants have a pattern of living that hardly distinguishes itself from that of persons of non-immigrant background.

A great proportion of the immigrant population lives in Oslo

Norway has an immigrant population of 305 000. Of these, 210 000 are of non-western background. As much as 80 000, or 38 per cent, of non-western immigrants live in Oslo, versus 23 per cent of immigrants of western background and barely 10 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background. Since a great part of the immigrant population lives in Oslo, conditions in Oslo have a greater influence on the living conditions of immigrants than that of the rest of the population.

More residents in every dwelling among non-western immigrants

Whereas only 17 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background live in dwellings with more than four persons, as much 31 per cent of the population of non-western background live in dwellings with more than four persons. This particularly applies to persons from Asia who live in the largest households. As much as 60 per cent of immigrants from Pakistan live in dwellings with 5 or more persons. It is also common to find such large dwelling households among persons from Afghanistan, Somalia and Yugoslavia.

Whereas people from Norway and Western Europe tend to have 2 or 4 persons living together in each dwelling, figures for some groups from Africa are different. The tendency is for one person to live in each dwelling or to have 5 or more persons in each dwelling.

Share of persons in households with 3 or more occupants who live in close quarters (less than 1 room per occupant)

Non-western immigrants live in cramped dwellings

Persons of immigrant background live in more cramped conditions than persons of non-immigrant background. This is particularly true for persons from non-western countries. 54 per cent of persons of non-western background living in households of more than two persons and have less than one room per person available for their use. For immigrants from western countries the figure is 18 per cent and 14 per cent for persons of non-immigrant background (figure 1). When we look at the same figures for Oslo, we find that the differences are even more accentuated. 66 per cent of persons of non-western background who live in households of more than two persons have less than one room per person available for their use. For western immigrants and persons of non-immigrant background the figures are respectively 27 per cent and 18 per cent (figure 2).

Area

Whereas only 4 per cent of all residents of non-immigrant background lived in dwellings with less than 50 m2 utility area, the figure for non-western immigrants is 17 per cent. Corresponding figures for Oslo are respectively 11 and 19 per cent. Of those of non-immigrant background, 68 per cent lived in dwellings of 100 m2 or more. 35 per cent of non-western immigrants had a dwelling of 100 m2 or more. This pattern is also clear for the largest households. Of persons without immigrant background in households of more than 4 persons, 35 per cent lived in dwellings of 200 m2 or more. Only 7 per cent of non-western immigrants in similar households lived in dwellings of 200 m2 or more.

Great differences in types of dwellings

It is most common for persons of non-immigrant background to live in detached houses. Blocks of flats and flats are most common among non-western immigrants. In the most urban municipalities 54 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background live in detached houses, while only 19 per cent of non-western immigrants live in detached houses. Corresponding figures in the least urban municipalities are 87 and 60 per cent. In Oslo alone, 58 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background live in blocks of flats. For persons of western immigrant background this figure is 64 per cent and as much as 82 per cent for persons of non-western background.

Fewer of immigrant background own their dwelling, yet great differences

The majority without immigrant background owns their dwelling (84 per cent). Corresponding figures vary for persons of non-western background. Whereas only 19 per cent of immigrants from Iraq and Afghanistan own their dwelling, as much as 74 per cent of persons originating from India and 67 per cent from Pakistan own their dwelling. Duration of residency in Norway is probably of significance for whether one owns or rents the dwelling. Iraqis and Afghans have relatively short residency in Norway, while Indians and Pakistanis belong to the groups with longest residency. The immigrant population is also generally younger than the population of non-immigrant background. This tends to emphasise the differences we find.

Among non-western immigrants who own their dwelling, it is more common to own through housing co-operatives or limited companies than for persons without immigrant background.

Persons of non-immigrant background are sole owners or have co-ownership (73 per cent). Only 11 per cent own through a housing co-operative or limited company. More than one-third of immigrants originating from Sri Lanka, Turkey and Pakistan own through a housing co-operative or limited company. The high density of immigrants in Oslo is an important factor as Oslo has the highest proportion of housing co-operative owners.

Half of the immigrant population has access to their own garden

Only 3 per cent of persons of non-immigrant background have no access to a garden, balcony, veranda or terrace. Among persons originating from Africa the corresponding figure is almost 20 per cent. The proportion with access to their own garden is considerably greater for persons without immigrant background. More than 80 per cent of these have access to their own garden, while the proportion is barely 50 per cent among immigrants. This proportion is lower in Oslo; nonetheless the difference is about the same (40: 20). When we look at the nation as a whole and in Oslo, the proportion with access to their own garden is lowest among persons of African background. In Oslo about one-third of the population has access to a joint garden shared with neighbours. This proportion is about the same for persons with and without immigrant background.

Persons of immigrant background are defined as persons born abroad of two foreign-born parents (first-generation immigrants). And persons born in Norway of two foreign-born parents. The latter are born in Norway but have both parents and all four grandparents born abroad.

Tables


Population, by type of household and immigrant population's country. 3 November 2001


Occupants in private dwellings, by type of building, centrality of the residence municipality and immigrant population's country. 3 November 2001


Occupants in private dwellings, by type of building and immigrant population's country. 3 November 2001


Occupants in private dwellings, by tenure status and immigrant population's country. 3 November 2001


Occupants in private dwellings, by number of occupants in the dwelling and immigrant population's country. 3 November 2001


Occupants in private dwellings, by number of rooms, immigrant population's country and number of occupants in the dwelling. 3 November 2001


Occupants in private dwellings, by utility floor space, immigrant population's country and number of occupants in the dwelling. 3 November 2001


Occupants in private dwellings, by year of construction, immigrant population's country and number of occupants in the dwelling. 3 November 2001


Persons in private households, by access to facilities and immigrant population's country. 3 November 2001


Persons in private households, by type of household, immigrant population's country and tenure status. 3 November 2001